Found 127 Documents across 13 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. How marginal are forager habitats?Porter, Claire C. - Journal of Archaeological Science, 2007 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the quality of forager habitats to determine whether agriculturalists occupy the most productive areas while modern forager groups are relegated to poor habitats. Findings indicate that there are slight but insignificant differences in the net primary productivity of foragers’ land and agriculturalists’ land. Further analysis of types of agriculturalists suggest that horticulturalists live in the most productive habitats, followed by intensive agriculturalists and finally pastoralists.

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  2. Not just dead meat: an evolutionary account of corpse treatment in mortuary ritualsWhite, Claire - Journal of Cognition and Culture, 2015 - 1 Hypotheses

    Authors suggest that in a majority of studied societies, kin of the deceased tend to engage ritually in risky prolonged and intimate preparation behaviors with corpses. This occurs namely in visual exposure and tactile interaction. Authors hypothesize that this extended contact not only allows true confirmation of death (through exposure to many cues), but also facilitates acceleration of a grieving process that returns the bereaved to a normal state of social functioning.

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  3. The dead may kill you: Do ancestor spirit beliefs promote cooperation in traditional small-scale societiesWhite, Claire - The Journal of Cognition and Culture, 1 - 3 Hypotheses

    Using 57 cultures from the Human Relations Area Files database, this paper examines the function and effectiveness of the belief of punitive ancestors in small-scale societies. The authors found that belief in dangerous ancestral entities is widespread and common and that harm is preventable through ritualized mortuary practices. The authors concluded that the fear of ancestral spirits did not promote social cooperation or inhibit self-interest behavior, contrary to the supernatural punishment hypothesis.

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  4. Slavery as a system of production in tribal societyBaks, C. - Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, 1966 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the conditions under which slavery occurs in preindustrial societies. Results suggest that social stratification and the existence of open resources are both necessary conditions for the occurrence of slavery.

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  5. 'Bureaucracy' and 'rationality' in Weber's organization theoryUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - American Sociological Review, 1959 - 3 Hypotheses

    "Seven of Max Weber's ideal-typical specifications for 'rational bureaucracy' are reformulated as a system of three 'bureaucratic' and four 'rational' variables. It is proposed that (a) bureaucratic variables are positively associated; (b) rational variables are positively associated; but that (c) rational variables are negatively associated with bureaucratic variables." Hypotheses are supported.

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  6. Exploring the thrifty genotype's food-shortage assumptions: a cross-cultural comparison of ethnographic accounts of food security among foraging and agricultural societiesBenyshek, Daniel C. - American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2006 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article tests the assumption that foragers are more likely to experience regular and severe food shortages than sedentary agriculturalists. The results indicate that there is no statistical difference in the quantity of available food or the frequency or extent of food shortages between preindustrial foragers, recent foragers, and agriculturalists.

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  7. Wife-husband intimacy and female status in cross-cultural perspectivede Munck, Victor C. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article examines predictors of intimacy between husbands and wives. Emphasis is on equality of spouses. A causal model is presented.

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  8. Subsistence and the evolution of religionPeoples, Hervey C. - Human Nature, 2012 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study exmaines the presence of High Gods in societies as a function of subsistence type, population size, and stratification. High Gods are thought to be a mechanism to encourage collective action in the face of environmental challenges. Animal husbandry was found to be a strong predictor of High Gods, especially gods that are active in human affairs or morally supportive.

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  9. Privacy, love and in-law avoidanceCozby, Paul C. - American Psychological Association. 79th Annual Convention, Proceedings., 1971 - 2 Hypotheses

    Authors explore the relationship between privacy among newlywed couples and romantic love as a basis for marriage. Authors also consider the relationship between newlywed privacy and kin avoidence. Both associations are found to be statistically significant.

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  10. House types and settlement patternsRobbins, Michael C. - Minnesota Archaeologist, 1966 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article proposes that ground plans may be used as a criterion for determining the relative permanence of settlement patterns in archaelogical societies. Results suggest that impermanent settlements and small community size are significantly associated with circular ground plans and that permanent settlements with larger community sizes are significantly associated with rectangular ground plans.

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