Found 107 Documents across 11 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous responseScelza, B. A. - Nature Human Behavior, 2019 - 6 Hypotheses

    In an effort to better understand variation in jealous response cross-culturally, the researchers of this study surveyed 11 different populations, eight of which were small-scale societies on five different continents (Mayangna, Shuar, Tsimane, Himba, Hadza, Karo Batak, Mosuo, and Yasawa) and three of which were in urban settings (Los Angeles, CA, "urban India" (online), and Okinawa, Japan). Looking at the differences between sexual and emotional infidelity, researchers found that greater paternal investment and lower frequency of extramarital sex are associated with more severe jealous response.

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  2. Why there are so few women warriorsAdams, David B. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1983 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on the effect of type of warfare and community intermarriage on women's participation in warfare.

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  3. Why women's status changes in the middle ages: the turns of the social ferris wheelBart, Pauline B. - Sociological Symposium, 1969 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on the cross-cultural data comparing the relationship between changes in status and availability of important roles, with an emphasis on women. Cultural and structural aspects of society are examined to discover their relationship to the position of women after their child-bearing years.

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  4. Avunculocality and incest: the development of unilateral cross-cousin marriage and Crow-Omaha kinship systemsEyde, David B. - American Anthropologist, 1961 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the relationship between Crow kinship terminology and avunculocality. Results indicate that if matrilateral cross-cousin marriage is associated with Crow kinship systems, then societies that are avunculocal are more likely have Crow systems.

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  5. Historical inference from cross-cultural data: the case of dowryJackson, Gary B. - Ethos, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study posits that dowry is a recent historical development, and that cultural complexity is a necessary but not sufficient cause for its emergence. Comparisons of frequencies support these claims.

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  6. The relation between social stratification and social controlMoore, B., Jr. - Sociometry, 1942 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article explores the relationship between social stratification and control hierarchies, defined as "command-obedience relationships" within economic, political, religious, military, and familial institutions. Results indicate a positive association.

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  7. Social structure and games: a cross-cultural analysis of the structural correlates of game complexitySilver, Burton B. - Pacific Sociological Review, 1978 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines the evolution of games, particularly the way the complexity of games is affected by political organization, demographics, social differentiation, and religious differentiation.

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  8. Anonymity and the rise of universal occasions for religious ritual: an extension of the durkheimian theoryReeves, Edward B. - Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 1992 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article describes the rise of abstracted religious beliefs in larger, more anonymous societies and investigates whether societal density and differentiation have had similar effects on ritual. The authors suggest that the universalization of ritual is due in part to interrelated effects of population size, political hierarchy, economic division of labor, and monetary exchange, all factors that create anonymity in society.

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  9. Human-pet dynamics in cross-cultural perspectiveGray, Peter B. - Anthrozoos, 2010 - 0 Hypotheses

    The data in this study attempts to address questions related to cross-cultural similarities and differences in human-pet dynamics. A distribution of pet types across a cross-cultural sample is provided, along with descriptions of the functions and treatment of pets cross-culturally.

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  10. The cultural contribution to jealousy: cross-cultural aggression in sexual jealousy situationsHupka, Ralph B. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1990 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between social structures and sexual jealousy. Results suggest that social structures that emphasize the importance of pair-bonding, progeny, personal property, and exclusive marital sex relations are associated with sexual jealousy in males.

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