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  1. A preliminary study of cross-sexual joking relationships in primitive societyBrant, Charles S. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 4 Hypotheses

    The author analyzes the association between joking behavior and four types of instutionalized potential marriage relationships. Results show a tendency for a joking relationship to occur in all cases.

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  2. Sexual differentiation in socialization and some male genital mutilationsHarrington, Charles - American anthropologist, 1968 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study differentiates between circumcision and supercision, two male genital mutilations which are thought to correlate with different gender socialization processes. Results suggest that circumcision occurs in societies with higher sexual differentiation in socialization while supercision occurs in societies with lower sexual differentiation in socialization.

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  3. Affiliations: Structural Determinants of Differential Divorce RatesAckerman, Charles - American Journal of Sociology, 1963 - 4 Hypotheses

    Ackerman performs a cross-cultural analysis on the structural determinants of divorce rate as originally hypothesized by Max Gluckman and elaborated on by other researchers. Ackerman's results suggest that when spouses share a network of affiliation, divorce rates are low; when spouses maintain separate affiliations, divorce rates are high. Ackerman's statistical analysis and discussion provide an explanatory framework for further research.

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  4. Conjunctive Affiliation and DivorceAckerman, Charles - A Modern Introduction to The Family, 1968 - 3 Hypotheses

    Sampling 62 societies from the HRAF database (32 bilateral, 21 patrilineal, 6 matrilineal, and 3 double-unilineal societies)the author asks whether divorce rates can be predicted by the descent systems or the network of marriage affiliations. Findings do not support the theory that divorce rates will be predicted by descent (patrilineal vs bilateral) - but they are more consistent with the idea that conjunctive affiliations are predictive of low divorce rates in bilateral societies. In lineal societies the levirate is used as an indicator.

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  5. Motives for male circumcision among preliterate and literate peoplesWeiss, Charles - The Journal of Sex Research, 1966 - 0 Hypotheses

    Weiss examines the ethnological, medical, and psychoanalytic literature to better understand what incites preliterate and literate societies to practice male circumcision. The review suggests there is vast cross-cultural variability for the operation and the resulting implications, or lack thereof, but no hypothesis tests are made.

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  6. A cross-cultural method for predicting nonmaterial traits in archeologyMcNett, Charles W., Jr. - Behavior Science Notes, 1970 - 2 Hypotheses

    "This paper presents an exploratory attempt to solve the problem of how to infer traits for which no direct material evidence remains." The author suggests that the archeologically defined community pattern can predict several sociocultural traits. Results support this hypothesis.

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  7. Factor analysis of a cross-cultural sampleMcNett, Charles W., Jr. - Behavior Science Notes, 1973 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study employs factor analysis to develop a settlement pattern scale of cultural complexity. Political, economic, and religious factors are identified and implications for the structure of the cultural system are discussed.

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  8. A settlement pattern scale of cultural complexityMcNett, Charles W., Jr. - A Handbook of Method in Cultural Anthropology, 1970 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author utilizes Beardsley et al.'s (1956) settlement pattern typology to develop a five-rank scale of cultural complexity. The scale was developed using 30 traits converted into categorical form. The scale is designed for use by archaeologists to infer or presume the existence of certain nonmaterial cultural traits in a given society.

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  9. Human sound systems are shaped by post-Neolithic changes in bite configurationBlasi, D.E. - Science, 2019 - 3 Hypotheses

    Using ethnography, historical linguistics, paleoanthropology, and speech biomechanics, the present study examines the relationship between labiodentals and the post-Neolithic period with the introduction of agriculture and softer diets. The results offer support for the linguist, Charles Hockett's, hypothesis that the shift in bite configuration in the post-Neolithic period, as well as the persistence of overbite and overjet, facilitates and makes the articulation of labiodentals more prevalent. Using cross-cultural comparison, findings also reveal that societies that produce their food are more likely to evolve and keep labiodentals than those that are not food-producing. Contact with other societiesis also a mode by which societies gain labiodentals. Lastly, the expansion of agricultural and food processing technology over time has been imperative to labiodental articulations.

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  10. Residential variation among hunter-gatherersEmber, Carol R. - Behavior Science Research, 1975 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study explores predictors of variation in two dimensions of marital residence patterns among hunter-gatherers: 1) the tendency toward patrilocality versus matrilocality and 2) the tendency toward unilocality versus bilocality.

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