Found 164 Documents across 17 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Sex differences in the ease of socialization: an analysis of the efficiency of child training processes in preindustrial societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines differences in the ease of socialization for male and female children in preindustrial societies. Results support the hypothesis that the socialization of females is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males.

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  2. Environmental vs. technological effects on childhood socialization processes: a cross-cultural studyWelch, Michael R. - International Journal of Sociology of the Family, 1980 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author expands on the findings of Barry, Bacon, and Child (1959), hypothesizing that type of environment is an intervening variable in the relationship between subsistence type and child training. A multiple classification analysis is used.

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  3. Sex differences in socialization anxietyWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1979 - 7 Hypotheses

    Authors look for associations between the gender of children and several dimensions of socialization anxiety.

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  4. Socialization anxiety and patterns of economic subsistenceWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines variation in childrens' socialization anxiety across societies of different subsistence types.

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  5. Social structural expansion, economic diversification, and concentration of emphases in childhood socialization: a preliminary test of value transmission hypothesesWelch, Michael R. - Ethos, 1984 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates the relationship between economic type and socialization of children. The author focuses on the concentration of value emphases in childhood socialization--that is, whether children are instilled with several different value orientations rather than just one or two. Value concentration is examined alongside subsistence technology and economic diversification; attention is also paid to gender differences.

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  6. Female exclusion from religious roles: a cross-cultural test of competing explanationsWelch, Michael R. - Social Forces, 1982 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines three theories regarding the lack of participation by women in community religious roles. Empirical analysis suggests that only resource theory has predictive power. Most clearly it suggests that women are more likely to be shamans in societies in which they are highly influential in kin networks but maintain minimal control of property. Neither gynephobia nor the presence of sex-differentiated social spheres appears associated with the prohibition of women’s participation in religious roles.

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  7. Childhood socialization differences in african and nonafrican societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study compares child socialization emphases in African and non-African societies. Results show that differences in child socialization are neglibible.

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  8. Longevity Among Hunter-Gatherers: A Cross-Cultural ExaminationGurven, Michael - Population and Development Review, 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article seeks to reevaluate the widespread assumption that hunter-gatherers lack the longevity that people in the modern, industrialized world enjoy. Through modeling life expectancy, mortality, and other demographic trends among extant hunter-gatherer, gatherer-horticulturalists, and horticulturalists societies they are able to challenge this belief. The authors conclude that longevity is a "novel feature of Homo sapiens" and that seven decades seems to be the natural lifespan of a human.

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  9. Process‐based modelling shows how climate and demography shape language diversityGavin, Michael C. - Global Ecology and Biogeography, 2017 - 2 Hypotheses

    Researchers examined both why so many language are spoken today, and why they are so unevenly distributed geographically. Instead of looking at correlative tests, this study uses a process-based simulation model that attempted to predict both the number or precolonial languages in Australia as well as the number of languages per unit of land. The model was based upon three basic assumptions: 1) humans fill unoccupied spaces; 2) rainfall limits population density; 3) groups divide after reaching a maximum population. While researchers used the model strictly on the Australia continent, it was able to correctly explain 56% of spatial variation in language richness, and predict the total number of languages across the continent. The accuracy of this model concludes that climatic conditions and changes in group size are important factors in shaping language diversity patterns and therefore global human cultural diversity.

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  10. Technological organization and settlement mobility: an ethnographic examinationShott, Michael - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1986 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the relationship between mobility and technology among foragers, with the intent of applying findings to the archaeological record. In data analysis, mobility frequency is differentiated from mobility magnitude, and technological diversity is differentiated from technological complexity. Results suggest that mobility frequency is negatively associated with technological diversity while mobility magnitude is negatively associated with technological complexity.

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