Found 79 Documents across 8 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Subsistence practices and human sexual dimorphism of statureWolfe, Linda D. - Journal of Human Evolution, 1982 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the validity of two previous diachronic studies examining the relationship between subsistence strategy and sexual dimorphism of stature with synchronic data. The authors find that neither hypothesis is valid.

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  2. Latitude and intersocietal variation of human sexual dimorphism of statureWolfe, Linda D. - Human Ecology, 1982 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between sexual dimorphism of stature and latitude; data support the association. The authors also find support for an association between latitude and human marriage systems, a variable proposed by Alexander (1979) to explain variation in sexual dimorphism of stature. When societies are categorized by latitude, the relationships between marriage systems and sexual dimorphism do not reach significance. Overall the authors emphasize the influence of environmental adaptation on sexual dimorphism rather than an explanation solely focused on male-male competition.

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  3. A cross-cultural investigation into the sexual dimorphism of statureWolfe, Linda D. - Sexual Dimorphism in Homo sapiens: A Question of Size, 1982 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines height and sexual dimorphism of stature from a sociobiological perspective. Diet, child rearing, and marriage practices are tested as possible factors contributing to height sexual dimorphism of stature. Results provide some support for a nutritional hypotheses, but sexual selection and parental investment are not statistically significant.

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  4. Comment on gaulin and schlegel (1980)Wolfe, Linda D. - Ethology and Sociobiology, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This comment suggests methodological flaws in Gaulin and Schlegel’s (1980) article on male parental certainty and investment practices. The authors take issue with multiple coding decisions and suggest that the findings from the 1980 study ought to be rejected; data does not support a positive association between male parental certainty and investment practices.

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  5. Parental certainty, subsistence and inheritance revisitedGray, J. Patrick - Journal of Human Evolution, 1981 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the results of a study (Gaulin 1980) on male parental certainty and subsistence type. Methodological errors are assessed and the hypotheses are retested.

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  6. Correlates of monogamy in human groups: tests of some sociobiological hypothesesGray, J. Patrick - Behavior Science Research, 1984 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study re-examines the hypotheses offered by Kleiman (1977) linking monogamy in humans to monogamy in other animals. Of seven hypotheses, only two were weakly supported when using a cross-cultural analysis.

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  7. Height and sexual dimorphism of stature among human societiesGray, J. Patrick - American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 1980 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article explores the relationship between sexual dimorphism of stature and variables of marriage, diet, subsistence and environment. Significant associations were found between security and plentifulness of food supply, protein availability, and sexual dimorphism of stature.

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  8. A note on brother inheritanceGray, J. Patrick - Ethnology and Sociobiology, 1982 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article presents a reanalysis of the theory put forth by Hartung (1981) regarding the relationship between inheritance and paternity confidence. The authors take issue with the original sample used and retest the hypothesis.

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  9. Residential variation among hunter-gatherersEmber, Carol R. - Behavior Science Research, 1975 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study explores predictors of variation in two dimensions of marital residence patterns among hunter-gatherers: 1) the tendency toward patrilocality versus matrilocality and 2) the tendency toward unilocality versus bilocality.

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  10. Our better nature: Does resource stress predict beyond-household sharingEmber, Carol R. - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2018 - 3 Hypotheses

    The present research investigates food sharing and labor sharing practices of 98 nonindustrial societies. The aims are to: 1) document the frequency and scope of sharing, and 2) test the theory that greater sharing is adaptive in societies subject to more resource stress (including natural hazards).

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