Found 2319 Hypotheses across 232 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Double descent societies with avunculocality will have polygyny significantly more than double descent societies that are patrilocal (254).Ember, Melvin - The conditions that may favor avunculocal residence, 1983 - 2 Variables

    This paper offers a tentative theory of avunculocal residence: societies that were matrilocal and matrilineal will be likely to develop avunculocality when they switch to internal warfare and experience a high male mortality rate. Some cross-cultural evidence to support this theory is provided.

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  2. Avunculocal soceities will be significantly more likely to practice polygyny than matrilocal societies (253).Ember, Melvin - The conditions that may favor avunculocal residence, 1983 - 3 Variables

    This paper offers a tentative theory of avunculocal residence: societies that were matrilocal and matrilineal will be likely to develop avunculocality when they switch to internal warfare and experience a high male mortality rate. Some cross-cultural evidence to support this theory is provided.

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  3. "Using polygyny as an indicator of relatively high male mortality . . . avunculocal societies are significantly more likely to practice polygyny than matrilocal societies" (206)Ember, Melvin - Conditions that may favor avunculocal residence, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This paper suggests that previously matrilocal and matrilineal societies which are subject to a high mortality rate when they switch to fighting internally will develop avunculocal residence. The cross-cultural data presented supports the hypothesis.

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  4. ". . . Unilocality is a necessary but not sufficient condition for unilineal descent" (70)Ember, Carol R. - On the development of unilineal descent, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This article tests some conditions that may lead to the emergence of unilineal descent, focusing on unilocality and warfare. Unilineal descent is thought to be likely in a unilocal society without a centralized political system that is experiencing intra- or inter-societal warfare. The authors also posit that a "clan" system usually develops prior to a "lineage" system.

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  5. ". . . intergroup competition is the most important catalyst in the formation of unilineal descent groups in unilocal societies" (74)Ember, Carol R. - On the development of unilineal descent, 1974 - 3 Variables

    This article tests some conditions that may lead to the emergence of unilineal descent, focusing on unilocality and warfare. Unilineal descent is thought to be likely in a unilocal society without a centralized political system that is experiencing intra- or inter-societal warfare. The authors also posit that a "clan" system usually develops prior to a "lineage" system.

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  6. In a multiple regression including non-sororal polygyny and marrying enemies as predictors, pathogen stress will not be significantly related to father-infant sleeping distance (108).Ember, Carol R. - War and socialization of children: comparing two evolutionary models, 2007 - 4 Variables

    This article presents two evolutionary models that may explain relationships between war and socialization of children: the "environmentally contingent reproductive strategy" (ECRS) model put forward by Draper and Harpending (1982), and a model put forward by Carol and Melvin Ember. Results do not provide support for the hypotheses involving father-infant sleeping proximity derived from the ECRS model. The authors also find some inconsistencies with their own model.

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  7. In a multiple regression, father-infant sleeping distance will be associated with warfare frequency, marrying enemies, and polygyny (108).Ember, Carol R. - War and socialization of children: comparing two evolutionary models, 2007 - 4 Variables

    This article presents two evolutionary models that may explain relationships between war and socialization of children: the "environmentally contingent reproductive strategy" (ECRS) model put forward by Draper and Harpending (1982), and a model put forward by Carol and Melvin Ember. Results do not provide support for the hypotheses involving father-infant sleeping proximity derived from the ECRS model. The authors also find some inconsistencies with their own model.

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  8. "Lineages develop prior to putative descent groups" (90)Ember, Carol R. - On the development of unilineal descent, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This article tests some conditions that may lead to the emergence of unilineal descent, focusing on unilocality and warfare. Unilineal descent is thought to be likely in a unilocal society without a centralized political system that is experiencing intra- or inter-societal warfare. The authors also posit that a "clan" system usually develops prior to a "lineage" system.

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  9. "A high male mortality in warfare is strongly associated with polygyny" (202)Ember, Melvin - Warfare, sex ratio and polygyny, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This paper suggests that polygyny may be best explained by uneven sex ratios, particularly an excess of women while men are engaged in warfare. The author also considers Whiting’s 1964 theory that used post-partum sex taboos to explain polygyny. These two theories are tested cross-culturally and results suggest that polygyny is a response to an unbalanced sex ratio in favor of women.

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  10. ". . . societies with internal warfare would tend to have at least one level of unilineal descent group typically contiguous, whereas societies with purely external warfare would not be as likely to have contiguous descent groups" (78)Ember, Carol R. - On the development of unilineal descent, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This article tests some conditions that may lead to the emergence of unilineal descent, focusing on unilocality and warfare. Unilineal descent is thought to be likely in a unilocal society without a centralized political system that is experiencing intra- or inter-societal warfare. The authors also posit that a "clan" system usually develops prior to a "lineage" system.

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