Found 1315 Hypotheses across 132 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. "The overall measures of indulgence in infancy and childhood show significant negative correlations with general consumption of alcohol" (35)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 6 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  2. "Indulgence of dependence is negatively related to frequency of [drunkenness]" (35)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 5 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  3. Increased frequency of drunkenness is associated with societal customs surrounding dependence, thereby (i) negatively associated with indulgence of dependence in infancy, (ii) positively associated with demands for achievement in childhood, and (iii) negatively associated with dependent-seeking behavior in adulthood (p. 866).Bacon, Margaret K. - The dependency-conflict hypothesis and the frequency of drunkenness, 1974 - 5 Variables

    This study is a reexamination of Bacon's (1965) previous cross-cultural study regarding drinking. The current study supports the dependency-conflict hypothesis that frequency of drunkenness is related to dependency needs in childhood and adulthood.

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  4. "There is a negative correlation between male narcissism and nurturant indulgence or gratification of infants" (255)Slater, Philip E. - Maternal ambivalence and narcissism: a cross-cultural study, 1965 - 4 Variables

    This article explores narcissism and child-rearing. The author presents a theory that, if a society’s structural pattern weakens the marital bond, the mother will be ambivalent toward the son who consequently will become narcissistic. This process would reinforce itself as it is repeated by each generation.

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  5. "If we combine the diffusion of nurturance ratings with the over-all indulgence ratings, the pattern of low diffusion/low indulgence characterizes the societies with aggressive deities" (164)Lambert, William W. - Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatura..., 1959 - 3 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

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  6. In societies where the inferred transition between infancy and childhood is low, polygynous marriage is occasional or common (248, 326).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Polygyny, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  7. "Last borns tend to be more often spoiled or indulged [but it does not reach significance]" (51)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Birth order in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  8. Findings: A factor analysis of key dimensions to describe a given culture yielded 12 factors. Factor 9, "child affection and indulgence", loaded highly and positively on high indulgence of infant and child; high display of affection to infant; high degree of drive reduction and satisfaction immediacy. Factor 9 loaded negatively on high inferred conflict regarding responsible, obedient, and self-reliant behavior for child; high degree of pain inflicted on infant by nurturant agent (61-62)Stewart, Robert A. C. - Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summary, 1972 - 6 Variables

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  9. "Those societies which are relatively neglectful of infants should be more afraid of ghosts at funerals than those societies in which children are treated indulgently during their infancy" (156)Whiting, John W.M. - Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of..., 1967 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  10. "Partial correlations showed a positive relation between [odor references in folktales and] oral satisfaction potential . . . sexual satisfaction potential . . . and average satisfaction potential in middle childhood" (4)Hines, Dwight - Possible rhinencephalic influences on human maternal behavior: a cross-cult..., 1974 - 4 Variables

    Authors study the correlation between maternal behavior and reference to odors in folktales. They find several significant relationships between odor references in folk tales, maternal behavior, and various aspects of infant and child socialization.

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