Found 3645 Hypotheses across 365 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. "Warlikeness appears to be related to . . . the lack of barriers to mobility" (64)Wright, Quincy - Primitive warfare and Appendix IX, 1942 - 2 Variables

    This chapter is concerned with correlates of warlikeness among non-industrial societies. Findings indicate that warlikeness is associated with climate, mobility, subsistence, political integration, division of labor, culture contact.

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  2. "Among the primitives it cannot be said that race is very closely related to war practices" (65)Wright, Quincy - Primitive warfare and Appendix IX, 1942 - 2 Variables

    This chapter is concerned with correlates of warlikeness among non-industrial societies. Findings indicate that warlikeness is associated with climate, mobility, subsistence, political integration, division of labor, culture contact.

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  3. "In general, the more the division of labor, the more warlike, the groups with compulsory classes being the most warlike of all primitive people" (67)Wright, Quincy - Primitive warfare and Appendix IX, 1942 - 2 Variables

    This chapter is concerned with correlates of warlikeness among non-industrial societies. Findings indicate that warlikeness is associated with climate, mobility, subsistence, political integration, division of labor, culture contact.

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  4. "In general, the groups with the most varied and frequent contacts [with civilized or semicivilized peoples] are the most warlike" (67)Wright, Quincy - Primitive warfare and Appendix IX, 1942 - 2 Variables

    This chapter is concerned with correlates of warlikeness among non-industrial societies. Findings indicate that warlikeness is associated with climate, mobility, subsistence, political integration, division of labor, culture contact.

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  5. "[Relation of subsistence level to warlikeness:] it seems clear that collectors, lower hunters and lower agriculturalists are the least warlike. The higher hunters and higher agriculturalists are more warlike, while highest agriculturalists and pastorals are most warlike" (66)Wright, Quincy - Primitive warfare and Appendix IX, 1942 - 2 Variables

    This chapter is concerned with correlates of warlikeness among non-industrial societies. Findings indicate that warlikeness is associated with climate, mobility, subsistence, political integration, division of labor, culture contact.

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  6. "Sociologically primitive peoples may be classified into those who are integrated in primary (clan), secondary (village), tertiary (tribe) and quaternary (tribal federations or states) groups. The first are the least and the latter are the most warlike" (66)Wright, Quincy - Primitive warfare and Appendix IX, 1942 - 2 Variables

    This chapter is concerned with correlates of warlikeness among non-industrial societies. Findings indicate that warlikeness is associated with climate, mobility, subsistence, political integration, division of labor, culture contact.

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  7. Borrowing in infant carrying practices will be seen within cool and cold climates and within warm and hot climates, but not between these regions (164).Whiting, John W.M. - Environmental constraints on infant care practices, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines infant carrying practices across cultures. The author suggests that infant carrying practices are affected by both climate and history. Findings indicate regional patterns in infant carrying practices and in the borrowing of infant carrying practices within regions. Results support the hypothesis.

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  8. Societies occupying harsher environments exhibit higher rates of alloparental care. (2)Martin, J.S. - Harsh environments promote alloparental care across human societies, 2020 - 2 Variables

    This study utilizes Bayesian statistics to test the associations between harsh environments (specifically those with higher degrees of climate variability and relatively lower average temperature and precipitation) and alloparental care in societies throughout the world. Results support the hypothesis that societies in harsher environments show higher rates of alloparental care and that societies with higher rates of starvation and resource stress exhibit lower rates of alloparental care. The authors explain this theorizing that in the former relative costs are sufficiently outweighed by the benefits of this type of cooperation and in the latter they are not. They conclude that their results support the plasticity of human alloparenting as a response to varying ecology.

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  9. Societies in environments that lead to higher rates of starvation exhibit lower rates of alloparental care. (2)Martin, J.S. - Harsh environments promote alloparental care across human societies, 2020 - 2 Variables

    This study utilizes Bayesian statistics to test the associations between harsh environments (specifically those with higher degrees of climate variability and relatively lower average temperature and precipitation) and alloparental care in societies throughout the world. Results support the hypothesis that societies in harsher environments show higher rates of alloparental care and that societies with higher rates of starvation and resource stress exhibit lower rates of alloparental care. The authors explain this theorizing that in the former relative costs are sufficiently outweighed by the benefits of this type of cooperation and in the latter they are not. They conclude that their results support the plasticity of human alloparenting as a response to varying ecology.

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  10. Circumcision occurs frequently in tropical climates. Author shows exclusive mother-infant sleeping arrangements occur in warm climates, while previous studies report a strong association between exclusive mother-infant sleeping arrangements and male circumcision (515)Whiting, John W.M. - Effects of climate on certain cultural practices, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study explores ecological reasons that might explain why boys are mostly circumcised in tropical regions, particularly in Africa and the insular Pacific. The author postulates a long causal chain linking: 1) tropical climate to the growing of root and fruit crops; 2) the need to keep babies on mother's milk for as long as possible where the adult diet is lacking in protein; 3) a long post-partum sex taboo as a way to space births; 4) the practice of polygyny (and associated mother-child sleeping) in the face of a long sex taboo; 5) patrilocal residence; and 6) male initiation ceremonies which are believed to result from the combination of mother-child sleeping, the long poast-partum sex taboo and patrilocal residence.

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