Found 3124 Hypotheses across 313 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Marriage of female war captives (x small population) will be positively associated with polygyny (p. 875).White, Douglas R. - Causes of polygyny: ecology, economy, kinship, and warfare, 1988 - 2 Variables

    This article uses two dependent variables: acceptance of polygyny (the rules) and and the percentage of women in polygynous marriages (the behavior). The rules of marriage are best predicted by social structural variables (e.g. warfare, fraternal interest groups) whereas actual marriage behaviors are best predicted by economic and ecological variables (e.g. climate zone). Deemphasizing exclusively reproductive or economic explanations for polygyny, the authors find polygyny is related to male-oriented kin groups, territorial expansion and migration, and marrying war captives. Polygyny is thus thought to have a stratifying effect on women and is ultimately a detriment to female status.

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  2. Environmental quality and homogeneity will be positively associated with polygyny (p. 876).White, Douglas R. - Causes of polygyny: ecology, economy, kinship, and warfare, 1988 - 2 Variables

    This article uses two dependent variables: acceptance of polygyny (the rules) and and the percentage of women in polygynous marriages (the behavior). The rules of marriage are best predicted by social structural variables (e.g. warfare, fraternal interest groups) whereas actual marriage behaviors are best predicted by economic and ecological variables (e.g. climate zone). Deemphasizing exclusively reproductive or economic explanations for polygyny, the authors find polygyny is related to male-oriented kin groups, territorial expansion and migration, and marrying war captives. Polygyny is thus thought to have a stratifying effect on women and is ultimately a detriment to female status.

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  3. Constraints on expansion into new lands will be negatively associated with polygyny (p. 875-6).White, Douglas R. - Causes of polygyny: ecology, economy, kinship, and warfare, 1988 - 3 Variables

    This article uses two dependent variables: acceptance of polygyny (the rules) and and the percentage of women in polygynous marriages (the behavior). The rules of marriage are best predicted by social structural variables (e.g. warfare, fraternal interest groups) whereas actual marriage behaviors are best predicted by economic and ecological variables (e.g. climate zone). Deemphasizing exclusively reproductive or economic explanations for polygyny, the authors find polygyny is related to male-oriented kin groups, territorial expansion and migration, and marrying war captives. Polygyny is thus thought to have a stratifying effect on women and is ultimately a detriment to female status.

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  4. When controlling for pathogen stress and male mortality in war, fraternal interest groups will be positively associated with nonsororal polygynyEmber, Melvin - Comparing explanations of polygyny, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article uses logistic regression analysis to examine pathogen stress and male mortality in warfare as predictors of nonsororal polygyny. Differences between state and non-state societies are observed. The authors also retest variables from White and Burton's 1988 study on causes of polygyny, finding only fraternal interest groups and absence of plow significant.

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  5. When controlling for pathogen stress and male mortality in war, the absence of the plow will be positively associated with nonsororal polygynyEmber, Melvin - Comparing explanations of polygyny, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article uses logistic regression analysis to examine pathogen stress and male mortality in warfare as predictors of nonsororal polygyny. Differences between state and non-state societies are observed. The authors also retest variables from White and Burton's 1988 study on causes of polygyny, finding only fraternal interest groups and absence of plow significant.

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  6. Internal warfare will decrease with increasing external warfare, intercommunity trade, and patrilocal residence (6).Grueter, Cyril C. - On the emergence of large-scale human social integration and its antecedents..., 2014 - 4 Variables

    This article investigates whether external warfare, intercommunity trade, and female exogamy lead to more amicable intercommunity relationships. Intercommunity amicability is considered a historical facilitator of the large-scale integration of human groups. The absence of internal warfare is used as a measure for intercommunity amicability.

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  7. In nonstate societies, male mortality in warfare will be positively associated with nonsororal polygyny.Ember, Melvin - Comparing explanations of polygyny, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article uses logistic regression analysis to examine pathogen stress and male mortality in warfare as predictors of nonsororal polygyny. Differences between state and non-state societies are observed. The authors also retest variables from White and Burton's 1988 study on causes of polygyny, finding only fraternal interest groups and absence of plow significant.

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  8. In state societies, pathogen stress will be associated with nonsororal polygynyEmber, Melvin - Comparing explanations of polygyny, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article uses logistic regression analysis to examine pathogen stress and male mortality in warfare as predictors of nonsororal polygyny. Differences between state and non-state societies are observed. The authors also retest variables from White and Burton's 1988 study on causes of polygyny, finding only fraternal interest groups and absence of plow significant.

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  9. In a multiple regression, father-infant sleeping distance will be associated with warfare frequency, marrying enemies, and polygyny (108).Ember, Carol R. - War and socialization of children: comparing two evolutionary models, 2007 - 4 Variables

    This article presents two evolutionary models that may explain relationships between war and socialization of children: the "environmentally contingent reproductive strategy" (ECRS) model put forward by Draper and Harpending (1982), and a model put forward by Carol and Melvin Ember. Results do not provide support for the hypotheses involving father-infant sleeping proximity derived from the ECRS model. The authors also find some inconsistencies with their own model.

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  10. Pair-bond stability will be positively associated with polygyny (153).Quinlan, Robert J. - Evolutionary ecology of human pair-bonds: cross-cultural tests of alternativ..., 2007 - 2 Variables

    This study tests three hypotheses on the evolution of the human pair-bond: male-provisioning, male mating competition, and the defense of offspring from other males. Findings indicate that male provisioning and mating competition are factors in the development of the pair-bond. Additional findings indicate that alloparentling, polygyny, and equal contribution to subsistence by each sex contribute to the security of the pair-bond.

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