Found 4213 Hypotheses across 422 Pages (0.004 seconds)
  1. "[Marriage] ceremonies are associated with the importance of inheritable property"Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Marriage ceremonies, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates marriage ceremonies as a technique for encouraging commitment and protecting wealth and alliance stakes in a marriage. Hypotheses are supported.

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  2. "It was predicted that across societies sex relations between betrothed persons are more restricted than before betrothal where large amounts of wealth are transferred and less restricted where wealth transfer is minimal" (327)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Wealth transfer and restrictions on sexual relations during betrothal, 1969 - 2 Variables

    Authors use an exhange theory perspective to explain differences in sex restrictions during betrothal. Results indicate a positive association between the amount of wealth transferred and sex restrictions during betrothal.

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  3. "Firstborn adult sons are more likely than average adult sons to have power or influence over other people, and they are more likely to head a kin group" (51)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Birth order in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  4. "Firstborn sons are likely to have more authority over siblings . . . than later born sons, are likely to inherit or otherwise gain control of more family land, livestock, or wealth, and are likely to be respected by siblings. . . . Firstborn daughters . . . receive relatively more respect than their same-sex siblings" (51)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Birth order in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 4 Variables

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  5. "Firstborn children or firstborn children of a given sex tend to increase parental status, to provide parents with a teknonym, to make parent marriage stable" (50-51)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Birth order in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 4 Variables

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  6. Magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions to childlessness will be more likely to be tried first than adoption or fosterage, divorce, or polygyny (224-5).Rosenblatt, Paul C. - A cross-cultural study of responses to childlessness, 1973 - 1 Variables

    This study investigates responses to childlessness in a cross-cultural sample. Solutions to childlessness appear universal, and magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions seem the most likely to be tried first. Empirical analysis also shows that women are blamed for childlessness more often than men, which the authors suggest could be due to women’s lower status.

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  7. Love magic is likely to be a communicative form of magic (482).Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Communication in the practice of love magic, 1971 - 1 Variables

    This paper investigates love magic, proposing that it is a form of indirect communication in the development of male-female bonds. Findings support the hypothesis.

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  8. "Penalties for adultery [are] related [negatively] to . . . trial marriage" (123)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Divorce for childlessness and the regulation of adultery, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This study attempts to expand on the list of common customs employed to cope with childlessness in a marriage. Authors specifically examine the relationship between the presence of customs that help cope with childlessness and the severity of punishment for adultery. Results indicate a significant relationship between these two variables.

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  9. "Firstborns receive more elaborate ceremonies at birth . . . are given more duties to perform, have authority over siblings, and receive more respect from siblings" (51)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Birth order in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 5 Variables

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  10. "Penalties for adultery are related in the expected direction for presence of plural marriage, frequency of adoption, and legitimate sex outside of marriage. But . . . such small numbers of cases [do not] approach . . . statistical significance" (123-124)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Divorce for childlessness and the regulation of adultery, 1972 - 4 Variables

    This study attempts to expand on the list of common customs employed to cope with childlessness in a marriage. Authors specifically examine the relationship between the presence of customs that help cope with childlessness and the severity of punishment for adultery. Results indicate a significant relationship between these two variables.

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