Found 2991 Hypotheses across 300 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. A test for association between the suicide rate and fear of death found no supportLester, David - The fear of death in primitive societies, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This study tests for potential correlates of the fear of death in non-literate societies. Significant associations were found between the use of love-oriented techniques for punishment and a fear of death and a high need to achieve and a fear of death.

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  2. The incidence of homicide will be associated with the need for achievement and the need for power (161).Lester, David - National motives and psychogenic death rates, 1968 - 3 Variables

    This study investigates possible relationships between the need for achievement and power (as measured in folktales) with rates of suicide and homicide in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests that homicide is not associated with either the need for achievement or power, but suicide is positively associated with the need for power.

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  3. "Evidence was found . . . for an association between a high need to achieve and a high fear of death" (229)Lester, David - The fear of death in primitive societies, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This study tests for potential correlates of the fear of death in non-literate societies. Significant associations were found between the use of love-oriented techniques for punishment and a fear of death and a high need to achieve and a fear of death.

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  4. "Evidence was found for an association between use of love-oriented techniques of punishment and a high fear of death" (229)Lester, David - The fear of death in primitive societies, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This study tests for potential correlates of the fear of death in non-literate societies. Significant associations were found between the use of love-oriented techniques for punishment and a fear of death and a high need to achieve and a fear of death.

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  5. The incidence of suicide will be associated with the need for achievement (161).Lester, David - National motives and psychogenic death rates, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates possible relationships between the need for achievement and power (as measured in folktales) with rates of suicide and homicide in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests that homicide is not associated with either the need for achievement or power, but suicide is positively associated with the need for power.

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  6. "The incidence of suicide . . . was significantly correlated with the need for power . . ." (1260)Lester, David - National motives and psychogenic death rates, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates possible relationships between the need for achievement and power (as measured in folktales) with rates of suicide and homicide in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests that homicide is not associated with either the need for achievement or power, but suicide is positively associated with the need for power.

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  7. ". . . A significant relationship exists between n Achievement level in folk tales and presence or absence of full-time entrepreneurial activity in the culture" (67)McClelland, David C. - The achieving society, 1961 - 2 Variables

    The cross-cultural test on preindustrial societies is a very minor part of a larger work testing the theory that a psychological factor--need for achievement--plays a large role in understanding economic growth and decline. Most of the work focuses on countries and complex societies in the historical past.

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  8. "The prediction was that a high incidence of suicide would be associated with a low fear of the dead" (207)Lester, David - The incidence of suicide and the fear of the dead in non-literate societies, 1971 - 2 Variables

    This study tests for an association between suicide rates and cultural fear of the dead. Tests do not support a significant relationship.

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  9. The cultural transmission model of ethnoscientific expertise predicts reputation for efficacy and generosity, hierarchy within domains of expertise, widespread knowledge domain, teaching by experts, prestige, assistance with common problems, influence outside areas of expertise, deference to experts, and others seeking proximity to experts.Lightner, Aaron D. - Ethnoscientific expertise and knowledge specialisation in 55 traditional cul..., 2021 - 11 Variables

    The authors of this exploratory study tested predictions from five different theoretical models for the evolution of ethnoscientific expertise. They claim support for three of the models. They then compared cultural variables and their five models to three different knowledge domains: conceptual (unable to be easily observed), motor (easily observable), and medicinal. Their results indicate that their cultural transmission model is associated with the motor knowledge domain and that their proprietary knowledge model is associated with the medicinal knowledge domain.

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  10. "…rejected children are more achievement-oriented than accepted children [but this relationship between achievement and parental aceptance-rjection breaks down in adulthood]" (Rohner 1975: 102, 104)Rohner, Ronald P. - They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental..., 1975 - 3 Variables

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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