Found 2892 Hypotheses across 290 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. "The following variables of societal organization significantly distinguish monogamous from polygynous societies: (1) type of subsistence economy; (2) system of social stratification; (3) level of political integration; (4) pattern of settlement . . ." (10)Osmond, Marie W. - Toward monogamy: a cross-cultural study of correlates of type of marriage, 1965 - 5 Variables

    This study presents a sociological theory of marriage type based on socioeconomic organization. Results suggest that intensive agriculture, more stratification, greater political integration, a fixed settlement pattern, a larger population, and greater labor specialization tended to be correlates of monogamy.

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  2. "The relationship of monogamy and independent families to societal complexity is more adequately described by a curvilinear model than by a linear model" (221)Sheils, Howard Dean - Monogamy and independent families, 1971 - 3 Variables

    This article suggests that the relationship of monogamy and independent families to societal complexity is best represented by a curvilinear rather than a linear model. Though the variance explained in this relationship is low, it is somewhat increased when variables are scored as dummy variables rather than ordinal.

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  3. Aged women have tended to acquire property rights in simple societies and within matrilineal types of family organization. Aged men have tended to gain greatest control of property in more complex societies and within patrilineal family organization (49)Simmons, Leo W. - The role of the aged in primitive society, 1945 - 4 Variables

    Explores 109 traits relating primarily to physical habitat, economy, political and social organization, and religion, to see how they relate to the role and treatment of the aged. General patterns were sought. Numerous ethnographic examples are given.

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  4. Nuclear family type will be positively correlated with GDP.Baudin, Thomas - Economics and Family Structures, 2021 - 2 Variables

    Through review of the economic literature and cross-cultural analysis of families (nuclear, stem, and complex), the authors show that family type is heterogeneous and argue that types other than nuclear have been largely ignored by economists. They encourage, based on their findings, further research on family structure and the development of better models for household decision making. They use ancestral populations in the ethnographic record to estimate country-level family patterns.

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  5. ". . . hunting-collecting and herding communities should tend to be migratory, with band organization; whereas fishing and agricultural communities should tend to be sedentary, with village organization" (292)Goodenough, Ward H. - Basic economy and community, 1969 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines relationships among mode of production, sedentarism, and population size. Generally, agricultural societies were found to be sedentary and have larger populations, while migratory societies (such as herders or hunters) had smaller population size.

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  6. "When technology, as measured by subsistence economy is held constant . . . [and we] cross tabulate familial complexity with . . . [permanence of settlement and with stratification] . . . correlations [are] nonsignificant . . . at all levels of technology" (909)Blumberg, Rae Lesser - Societal complexity and familial complexity: evidence for the curvilinear h..., 1972 - 4 Variables

    This study investigates the relationship between societal complexity and familial complexity. Results suggest that the relationship is somewhat curvilinear; that is, in simpler societies more societal complexity is associated with a larger familial system, but the most developed societies have smaller familial systems. The demographic, economic, and politcal correlates of maximum family size are discussed.

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  7. "Monogamy is significantly related to a greater degree of societal complexity than is polygyny. . . . The organizational pattern most characteristic of polygynous societies can be noted as relatively intermediate in complexity rather than very simple" (15)Osmond, Marie W. - Toward monogamy: a cross-cultural study of correlates of type of marriage, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study presents a sociological theory of marriage type based on socioeconomic organization. Results suggest that intensive agriculture, more stratification, greater political integration, a fixed settlement pattern, a larger population, and greater labor specialization tended to be correlates of monogamy.

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  8. "Family organization is highly related to subsistence patterns, and in addition family organization predicts the type of child training to a very great extent" (219)Romney, A. Kimball - Variations in household structure as determinants of sex-typed behavior, 1965 - 3 Variables

    This review article explores relationships among socialization practices, family organization, and sex-typed behavior. The role of subsistence type is also considered.

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  9. Participation by the aged in general activities is dependent upon climate, permanency of residence, basic maintenance activities and family organization. The opportunity of the aged to participate in subsistence activities increases among herders and agriculturalists. Aged males are more likely to contribute to infant and child care in matriarchal societies. Midwifery is practiced by aged women regardless of cultural determinants (102, 103, 104)Simmons, Leo W. - The role of the aged in primitive society, 1945 - 7 Variables

    Explores 109 traits relating primarily to physical habitat, economy, political and social organization, and religion, to see how they relate to the role and treatment of the aged. General patterns were sought. Numerous ethnographic examples are given.

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  10. "Results . . . support expected relationships between subsistence type and societal differentiation and [between]subsistence type and settlement pattern" (150, 156, 159)Evascu, Thomas L. - A holocultural study of societal organization and modes of marriage: a gene..., 1975 - 3 Variables

    The author examines modes of marriage and societal organization from a functionalist (general evolutionary) perspective. He focuses on the relationships of subsistence (economic) patterns, settlement patterns, and social complexity to predicting modes of marriage, with particular emphasis on the importance of subsistence as an underlying structural influence upon social patterns.

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