Found 1859 Hypotheses across 186 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. "Firstborns receive more elaborate ceremonies at birth . . . are given more duties to perform, have authority over siblings, and receive more respect from siblings" (51)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Birth order in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 5 Variables

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  2. Birth ceremonies are more common in societies that customarily practice infanticide than in societies that do not (p. 72-3).Minturn, Leigh - Infanticide as a terminal abortion procedure, 1982 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the conceptual frameworks involved in infanticide. Authors first examine data on infanticide and birth ceremonies, particularly the timing of these events and the infant and adult involved in each. Authors also examine reasons for performing infanticide, including illegitimacy, unwanted children, and excess children, finding them similar to reasons for performing abortion. Population control and implications for children's and women's status are also discussed.

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  3. Compensation demands at birth will be positively associated with maternal restrictions from paternity-related agreements (e.g. maternal seclusion during birth) (674).Paige, Karen - The politics of birth practices: a strategic analysis, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This article examines cross-cultural variation in customary birth practices for men and women, testing a general hypothesis that birth practices represent tactics in negotiations over paternity. Data supports this hypothesis, and a series of related variables are tested in bivariate analysis and path analysis. Findings suggest that compensation demands at birth are associated with maternal restrictions from paternity-related agreements (e.g. maternal seclusion during birth), and fraternal interest groups are associated with the husband’s ritual involvement at birth (e.g. demonstration of the couvade).

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  4. "[When] we . . . correlated menarcheal age with the Landauer-Whiting measure of infant stress . . . pain and shaping did show a positive association" (226)Whiting, John W.M. - Menarcheal age and infant stress in humans, 1965 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between infant stress and early menarche. Empirical analysis suggests that stress in infancy, such as mother-infant separation and head-shaping, are associated with early menarche.

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  5. Fraternal interest groups will be negatively associated with the husband’s ritual involvement at birth (e.g. demonstation of couvade) (674).Paige, Karen - The politics of birth practices: a strategic analysis, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This article examines cross-cultural variation in customary birth practices for men and women, testing a general hypothesis that birth practices represent tactics in negotiations over paternity. Data supports this hypothesis, and a series of related variables are tested in bivariate analysis and path analysis. Findings suggest that compensation demands at birth are associated with maternal restrictions from paternity-related agreements (e.g. maternal seclusion during birth), and fraternal interest groups are associated with the husband’s ritual involvement at birth (e.g. demonstration of the couvade).

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  6. "Male solidarity dissolves the relationship between the two childhood factors [exclusive mother-son sleeping arrangement and patrilocal residence] and male initiation" (77)Young, Frank W. - Initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural study of status dramatization, 1965 - 4 Variables

    This book investigates a broad hypothesis linking social solidarity and initiation ceremonies. The author proposes that “the degree of solidarity of a given social system determines the degree to which status transitions within it will be dramatized” (1). A variety of operational hypotheses are supported for both male and female initiation ceremonies.

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  7. Presence of adolescent initiation ceremonies will be positively associated with acceptance of adolescent homosexual behavior (128).Schlegel, Alice - Adolescence: an anthropological inquiry, 1991 - 2 Variables

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  8. There will be an association between harsh male initiation ceremonies and training for obedience in late childhood, prior to adolescenceSchlegel, Alice - Pain, fear, and circumcision in boys' adolescent initiation ceremonies, 2017 - 2 Variables

    Schlegel and Barry explore the conditions under which adolescent boys' initiation ceremonies involve rituals that frighten or cause pain to the initiates. The authors look for cross-cultural differences and similarities in cultural features associated with harsh rituals, in particular, genital operations.

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  9. Late end of adolescence in boys will be positively associated with male-centered residence pattern (105).Schlegel, Alice - Adolescence: an anthropological inquiry, 1991 - 2 Variables

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  10. "As male solidarity is more institutionalized, the elaboration of initiation ceremonies increases" (74)Young, Frank W. - Initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural study of status dramatization, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates a broad hypothesis linking social solidarity and initiation ceremonies. The author proposes that “the degree of solidarity of a given social system determines the degree to which status transitions within it will be dramatized” (1). A variety of operational hypotheses are supported for both male and female initiation ceremonies.

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