Found 1736 Hypotheses across 174 Pages (0.065 seconds)
  1. "[There is] interaction between family structure and age of weaning [on the] . . . extent to which a person who gets sick blames himself (i.e., patient responsibility--an indirect measure of guilt assumption)" (164, 165)Whiting, John W.M. - Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of..., 1967 - 3 Variables

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  2. "Those societies with a long post-partum sex taboo . . . should be those who have the strongest belief in sorcery" (150)Whiting, John W.M. - Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of..., 1967 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  3. "[There is a] joint effect of duration of the post-partum sex taboo and the severity of socialization of aggression on the belief that sorcerers can cause sickness" (152)Whiting, John W.M. - Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of..., 1967 - 4 Variables

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  4. "Those societies which are relatively neglectful of infants should be more afraid of ghosts at funerals than those societies in which children are treated indulgently during their infancy" (156)Whiting, John W.M. - Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of..., 1967 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  5. "Societies where parents, relatively speaking, neglect their children during infancy and punish them severely for aggression during childhood, should be the socieites that fear the ghosts of the dead at funerals" (157)Whiting, John W.M. - Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of..., 1967 - 3 Variables

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  6. "Mother-child and polygynous societies are somewhat more likely than nuclear and extended to employ concurrently both Type II and Type III instruction [deliberate instruction by non-kin without change of residence and deliberate instruction by non-kin with change of residence]" (319)Herzog, John D. - Deliberate instruction and household structure: a cross-cultural study, 1962 - 2 Variables

    This study examines relationships among the instruction of children, household type and size, and political integration. Particular attention is paid to type of instruction--whether the instructor is kin or non-kin, and whether the instruction requires a change in the child's residence. Different types of instruction are theorized to solve problems for children in different household types (e.g. children in mother-child households experience gender identity conflict, and so leave their houses for instruction from non-kin). The causality between instruction and societal complexity is also discussed.

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  7. The presence of pathogen stress is positively correlated to increased ethnic diversity during pre-colonial times.Birchenall, Javier A. - Disease and diversity in long-term economic development, 2023 - 2 Variables

    This article uses the Standard Cross-Cultural Samples to test the relationship between disease and economic growth among sub-Saharan African societies. The authors suggest that a higher disease prevalence limits social integration and economic development since pre-colonial times. The variable measuring economic growth is the complexity of large or impressive structures. The hypotheses are that 1) pathogen stress is negatively correlated to the presence of complex buildings, and 2) pathogen stress is positively correlated to increased ethnic diversity. The results support both hypotheses, and there are additional results, like 1) the negative correlation between pathogen stress and current income per capita and 2) the negative correlation between the increased ethnic diversity and current income per capita. Overall, this article shows the robust relationship between disease and economic development.

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  8. "When some form of instruction is offered, Type II [deliberate instruction by non-kin without change of of residence] is employed by extended and nuclear societies, . . ." (319)Herzog, John D. - Deliberate instruction and household structure: a cross-cultural study, 1962 - 3 Variables

    This study examines relationships among the instruction of children, household type and size, and political integration. Particular attention is paid to type of instruction--whether the instructor is kin or non-kin, and whether the instruction requires a change in the child's residence. Different types of instruction are theorized to solve problems for children in different household types (e.g. children in mother-child households experience gender identity conflict, and so leave their houses for instruction from non-kin). The causality between instruction and societal complexity is also discussed.

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  9. Modular family living, rather than communal living, is associated with less pathogen stress.Tinston, Jennifer - Pathogen stress and living organization: A cross-cultural analysis, 2018 - 2 Variables

    The present study examines the relationship between pathogen prevalence and the domestic living-organization of 186 societies from the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS). The measurement for pathogen stress consists of ten diseases described by Low (1991) and Caden and Steele (2013). These are dengue, typhus, plague, filariae, schistosomes, leishmanias, trypanosomes, malaria, leprosy, and spirochetes; the transmission for these diseases was contagious and/or mobile. The measurement for the living organization came from the 'Household Form' variable by Murdock and White (1969). The seven categories of household form variable were then re-coded into two variables. The first is modular, which includes single-family and family homestead. The second is communal and includes large communal structure, multifamily household, husband rotates, individuals, married, and husband separate. The findings offer support for the evolutionary hypothesis that modular living is adaptive because it may reduce pathogen stress. Specifically, pathogen stress is influential in the way people live.

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  10. "Reported differences in personality descriptions among mixed farmers and pastoralists may be a result of a constellation of differences linked to the two types of economies" (295).Cone, Cynthia A. - Personality and subsistence: is the child the parent of the person?, 1979 - 7 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between personality traits and subsistence type in mixed farming and pastoralists societies. Findings suggest that differences in child socialization do not significantly predict personality differences in mixed farming and pastoralist societies as much as one would expect. Adult experiences should be considered as better predictors of personality traits.

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