Found 4306 Hypotheses across 431 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. "There . . . appears to be a relationship between the presence or absence of games of chance and the number of games of physical skill. Societies having 5 or more games of physical skill frequently have games of chance" (604)Roberts, John M. - Games in culture, 1959 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between game types (physical, strategy, and chance) and social, religious, and geographic variables. Hypotheses are supported.

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  2. ". . . the game-type combination scale is positively associated with . . . indicators of cultural complexity . . ." (7)Roberts, John M. - Inculcated traits and game-type combinations: a cross-cultural view, 1976 - 2 Variables

    This study relates the type of games present in a society to the level of cultural complexity. Authors use a "game-type combination scale" that categorizes societies as having: 1) games of physical skill only; 2) games of physical skill and games of chance; and 3) games of physical skill, games of chance, and games of strategy. Results show a relationship between the game-type combination scale and indicators of cultural complexity.

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  3. ". . . the sublcass of physical skill and strategy [games] demonstrates a relationship with anxiety about the nonperformance of achievement" (174)Roberts, John M. - Child training and game involvement, 1962 - 2 Variables

    This study builds on a previous study of games by Roberts, Arth and Bush (1959) and offers a conflict interpretation of game involvement. Several significant relationships are observed between game type and child training variables.

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  4. "Games of chance occur where . . . outcome . . . in the life situation [is] uncertain, not easily controlled by either physical skill or strategy in areas of environmental setting, food production, social and political interaction, marriage, war and religion" (143)Roberts, John M. - Cross-cultural correlates of games of chance, 1966 - 6 Variables

    Authors investigate the cross-cultural correlates of games of chance. They advance a "conflict-enculturation" model to explain why individuals choose to engage in games of chance in particular (as opposed to games of strategy or physical skill). They suggest that games of chance are linked to cultures with antecedent conflict and/or feelings of powerlessness in the presence of uncertainty; both are psychological stressors whose effects may be assuaged by play with uncertainty models in the form of games of chance.

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  5. "[There is a] relationship between games of strategy and social complexity . . ." (601)Roberts, John M. - Games in culture, 1959 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between game types (physical, strategy, and chance) and social, religious, and geographic variables. Hypotheses are supported.

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  6. "Games of chance will occur in societies [where the gods are regarded as] high in benevolence, low in aggression [and can be] coerced" (602)Roberts, John M. - Games in culture, 1959 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between game types (physical, strategy, and chance) and social, religious, and geographic variables. Hypotheses are supported.

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  7. "Games of chance occur in the presence of antecedent conflict, particularly in the areas of sex, aggression, achievement, and possibly responsibility" (143)Roberts, John M. - Cross-cultural correlates of games of chance, 1966 - 5 Variables

    Authors investigate the cross-cultural correlates of games of chance. They advance a "conflict-enculturation" model to explain why individuals choose to engage in games of chance in particular (as opposed to games of strategy or physical skill). They suggest that games of chance are linked to cultures with antecedent conflict and/or feelings of powerlessness in the presence of uncertainty; both are psychological stressors whose effects may be assuaged by play with uncertainty models in the form of games of chance.

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  8. "Games of physical skill [physical skill only or physical skill and strategy jointly] . . . show significant relationships with reward for achievement . . ." (174)Roberts, John M. - Child training and game involvement, 1962 - 2 Variables

    This study builds on a previous study of games by Roberts, Arth and Bush (1959) and offers a conflict interpretation of game involvement. Several significant relationships are observed between game type and child training variables.

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  9. Within each region, societies with the lowest percentage of long DRD4 alleles will tend to be sedentary, while societies with the highest percentage of long DRD4 alleles will tend to be nomadic (313-314).Chen, Chuansheng - Population migration and the variation of dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) allele..., 1999 - 2 Variables

    Dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) exhibits the largest number of polymorphisms of any dopamine receptor yet identified, and variation in DRD4 has been linked to variation in traits such as novelty-seeking and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. DRD4 also exhibits large variation between populations. Here, the authors test the hypothesis that natural selection acting on DRD4 may account for variation in between-population migratory patterns, using genetic and historical data from 39 populations.

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  10. Populations which have remained near their origin will show a lower proportion of long alleles of DRD4 than those that migrated further away (312).Chen, Chuansheng - Population migration and the variation of dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) allele..., 1999 - 2 Variables

    Dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) exhibits the largest number of polymorphisms of any dopamine receptor yet identified, and variation in DRD4 has been linked to variation in traits such as novelty-seeking and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. DRD4 also exhibits large variation between populations. Here, the authors test the hypothesis that natural selection acting on DRD4 may account for variation in between-population migratory patterns, using genetic and historical data from 39 populations.

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