Found 4610 Hypotheses across 461 Pages (0.038 seconds)
  1. "Mean number of instrument types per style sample appears as a correlate of social stratification" (155).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  2. Social complexity is positively associated with the following characteristics of song styles: wordiness, precision of articulation, explicitness, and narrow melodic intervals (128-137).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 6 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  3. "Increasing complexity tends to normalize voice qualities. . . . Nasalized tone and narrow . . . tone . . . [have a strong] negative relationship to good vocal blend" (193)Lomax, Alan - Folk song style and culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    A large-scale comparative study of folk songs around the world employing systematic measures (cantometrics). The aim was not just to describe variation but to test hypotheses about the relationships between song style and societal structures. Dance was also considered.

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  4. "Game producers, irrigationists, and nomadic pastoralists seldom sing cohesively. Some incipient producers, collectors, and plow agriculturalists employ good blend some of the time. The gardeners . . . usually sing cohesively" (176)Lomax, Alan - Folk song style and culture, 1968 - 3 Variables

    A large-scale comparative study of folk songs around the world employing systematic measures (cantometrics). The aim was not just to describe variation but to test hypotheses about the relationships between song style and societal structures. Dance was also considered.

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  5. Interlocking, a maximally individualized and leaderless style [in which everyone present sings independently in melody, rhythm, and harmony] occurs most frequently among cultures dependent on collecting (156).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  6. ". . . as far as songs are concerned, there is a distinct [positive] relationship between [social complexity, and] explicitness, the number of consonantal distinctions used, and the location of these distinctions in the mid- and front-enunciatory regions" (146).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 4 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  7. "The incidence of orchestral unison and one beat orchestral rhythm decreases with complexity. . . . The two most complex forms of organization of orchestral rhythm, counterpoint and heterophony [are] strongly associated with complex modes of production" (138, 139).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 4 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  8. "Overlap [between singing chorus and leader] is especially marked at the middle levels [of subsistence] whereas . . . explicit solo maintains a steady increase across the [subsistence] scale" (159).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  9. Stable settlements are more likely to sing together cohesively (188)Lomax, Alan - Folk song style and culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    A large-scale comparative study of folk songs around the world employing systematic measures (cantometrics). The aim was not just to describe variation but to test hypotheses about the relationships between song style and societal structures. Dance was also considered.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. "Game producers, irrigationalists, and nomadic pastoralists seldom sing cohesively. Some incipient producers, collectors, and plow agriculturalists employ good blend some of the time. The gardeners …usually sing cohesively" (176).Lomax, Alan - Social solidarity, 1968 - 3 Variables

    This chapter examines the relationship between social cohesion (measured using variables like subsistence type, stable work teams, and settlement patterns) and musical cohesion. All hypotheses are supported.

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