Found 4170 Hypotheses across 417 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. "A…strong relationship exists between the percentage of stable [work] teams found in a culture and the incidence of cohesive vocalizing per culture" (183).Lomax, Alan - Social solidarity, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines the relationship between social cohesion (measured using variables like subsistence type, stable work teams, and settlement patterns) and musical cohesion. All hypotheses are supported.

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  2. "Mean number of instrument types per style sample appears as a correlate of social stratification" (155).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  3. "Tonal cohesiveness and tonal relaxation . . . [and] polyphony in female choruses rise in direct proportion to the degree of feminine involvement in subsistence labor" (167-168)Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 4 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  4. "The five levels of performance style relate to [a] scale of increasingly complex governmental types in a remarkably stepwise way" (159-160).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 6 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  5. "Overlap [between singing chorus and leader] is especially marked at the middle levels [of subsistence] whereas . . . explicit solo maintains a steady increase across the [subsistence] scale" (159).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  6. "There is a strong relationship between increase of layering [social stratification] and elaboration in song style" (153).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  7. Interlocking, a maximally individualized and leaderless style [in which everyone present sings independently in melody, rhythm, and harmony] occurs most frequently among cultures dependent on collecting (156).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  8. "Simple alternation [between singing chorus and leader] . . . almost always indicates the presence of at least one or two levels of extra-local political control" (158).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  9. "Ayres found a significant relation between childhood training for compliance and cohesive singing and the contrastive correlation of assertiveness with individualized singing" (191).Lomax, Alan - Social solidarity, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines the relationship between social cohesion (measured using variables like subsistence type, stable work teams, and settlement patterns) and musical cohesion. All hypotheses are supported.

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  10. "The incidence of orchestral unison and one beat orchestral rhythm decreases with complexity. . . . The two most complex forms of organization of orchestral rhythm, counterpoint and heterophony [are] strongly associated with complex modes of production" (138, 139).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 4 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

    Related HypothesesCite