Found 3781 Hypotheses across 379 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. "If we control for level of political complexity, the magnitude of the relationship between the type of initiating party and the frequency of internal war in uncentralized political systems is increased . . ." (283)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 3 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  2. "When war is initiated by a responsible party of the political community, it is likely that the tactical system will be based upon both lines and ambushes" (41)Otterbein, Keith F. - The evolution of war: a cross-cultural study, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

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  3. ". . . the higher the level of political complexity, the less the likelihood of war being initiated by anyone in the political community" (282)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  4. "If culturally similar political communities unite to engage in external war, then internal war will be infrequent" (285)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  5. ". . . societies which frequently engage in war with their neighbors are less likely to have feuding than societies which have peaceful external relations" (1477)Otterbein, Keith F. - An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth: a cross-cultural study of feuding, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the presence of feuding, arguing that a solely evolutionary or functional approach misses important inter-societal factors. Results indicate that while fraternal interest groups are associated with feuding, the presence of war and level of political integration also increase the likelihood of feuding.

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  6. ". . . uncentralized political systems are more likely to have war initiated by anyone rather than by an official of the political community if fraternal interest groups are present" (282)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 3 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  7. "The higher the level of political centralization, the less likely that war can be initiated by any member of the political community" (29)Otterbein, Keith F. - The evolution of war: a cross-cultural study, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

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  8. "When war is initiated by a responsible party of the political community, it is likely that war will be initiated by announcement or by mutual agreement" (34)Otterbein, Keith F. - The evolution of war: a cross-cultural study, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

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  9. ". . . the lower the level of political complexity, the more likely the political communities within the cultural unit are to war with each other" (282)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  10. "The higher the degree of military sophistication, the more likely that the political communities of a cultural unit will engage in frequent or continual internal war" (85)Otterbein, Keith F. - The evolution of war: a cross-cultural study, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

    Related HypothesesCite