Found 4140 Hypotheses across 414 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. There is a ". . . relationship between frequency of attacking and military success" (114)Otterbein, Keith F. - Comment on 'correlates of political complexity', 1971 - 2 Variables

    This article answers questions raised by Abrahamson (1969) about the relationship between warfare and political complexity. Significant correlations were found between political complexity and the frequency of being attacked and between frequency of attacking and military success.

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  2. "[There is a] relationship between political complexity and the frequency of being attacked" (114)Otterbein, Keith F. - Comment on 'correlates of political complexity', 1971 - 2 Variables

    This article answers questions raised by Abrahamson (1969) about the relationship between warfare and political complexity. Significant correlations were found between political complexity and the frequency of being attacked and between frequency of attacking and military success.

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  3. [There is a] ". . . relationship between the frequency of being attacked and military success" (114)Otterbein, Keith F. - Comment on 'correlates of political complexity', 1971 - 2 Variables

    This article answers questions raised by Abrahamson (1969) about the relationship between warfare and political complexity. Significant correlations were found between political complexity and the frequency of being attacked and between frequency of attacking and military success.

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  4. ". . . the more frequently the political communities of a cultural unit are attacked, the more frequently they will attack other societies" (285)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  5. "If we control for level of political complexity, the magnitude of the relationship between the type of initiating party and the frequency of internal war in uncentralized political systems is increased . . ." (283)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 3 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  6. ". . . the higher the level of political complexity, the less the likelihood of war being initiated by anyone in the political community" (282)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  7. ". . . the lower the level of political complexity, the more likely the political communities within the cultural unit are to war with each other" (282)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  8. ". . . uncentralized political systems are more likely to have war initiated by anyone rather than by an official of the political community if fraternal interest groups are present" (282)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 3 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  9. ". . . internal war will be found in uncentralized political systems characterized by fraternal interest groups; . . . the presence of fraternal interest groups in centralized political systems . . . should have no effect on the frequency of internal war . . ." (284)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 3 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  10. ". . . internal war will be found in uncentralized political systems characterized by fraternal interest groups; . . . the presence of fraternal interest groups in centralized political systems . . . should have no effect on the frequency of internal war . . ." (284)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 3 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

    Related HypothesesCite