Found 3659 Hypotheses across 366 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. "Political complexity is directly related to the degree of external threat" (693)Abrahamson, Mark - Correlates of political complexity, 1969 - 2 Variables

    It is suggested that the degree of political complexity is more strongly related to degree of social differentiation than to size and concentration of population.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. ". . . the lower the level of political complexity, the more likely the political communities within the cultural unit are to war with each other" (282)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. "Political complexity is directly related to the degree of social differentiation . . . demographic complexity . . . and socioeconomic development" (691, 692, 693)Abrahamson, Mark - Correlates of political complexity, 1969 - 4 Variables

    It is suggested that the degree of political complexity is more strongly related to degree of social differentiation than to size and concentration of population.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. "Monogamy is significantly related to a greater degree of societal complexity than is polygyny. . . . The organizational pattern most characteristic of polygynous societies can be noted as relatively intermediate in complexity rather than very simple" (15)Osmond, Marie W. - Toward monogamy: a cross-cultural study of correlates of type of marriage, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study presents a sociological theory of marriage type based on socioeconomic organization. Results suggest that intensive agriculture, more stratification, greater political integration, a fixed settlement pattern, a larger population, and greater labor specialization tended to be correlates of monogamy.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. ". . . the higher the level of political complexity the less frequently feuding is found" (1476)Otterbein, Keith F. - An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth: a cross-cultural study of feuding, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the presence of feuding, arguing that a solely evolutionary or functional approach misses important inter-societal factors. Results indicate that while fraternal interest groups are associated with feuding, the presence of war and level of political integration also increase the likelihood of feuding.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. "Jurisdictional hierarchy . . . is positively associated with games of chance both for the world sample and outside North America" (302)Barry III, Herbert - Infant socialization and games of chance, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This paper explores the relationship between games of chance and various aspects of infant socialization, as well as subsistence economy and social organization. Several significant associations were found between these variables.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. ". . . internal war will be found in uncentralized political systems characterized by fraternal interest groups; . . . the presence of fraternal interest groups in centralized political systems . . . should have no effect on the frequency of internal war . . ." (284)Otterbein, Keith F. - Internal war: a cross-cultural study, 1968 - 3 Variables

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. "If political complexity has any influence on feuding, there should be a higher correlation between presence of fraternal interest groups and feuding in societies with a low level of political integration than in societies [with] a high level of political integration" (1476)Otterbein, Keith F. - An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth: a cross-cultural study of feuding, 1965 - 3 Variables

    This study investigates the presence of feuding, arguing that a solely evolutionary or functional approach misses important inter-societal factors. Results indicate that while fraternal interest groups are associated with feuding, the presence of war and level of political integration also increase the likelihood of feuding.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. "[There is a] relationship between political complexity . . . and the frequency of attacking" (114)Otterbein, Keith F. - Comment on 'correlates of political complexity', 1971 - 2 Variables

    This article answers questions raised by Abrahamson (1969) about the relationship between warfare and political complexity. Significant correlations were found between political complexity and the frequency of being attacked and between frequency of attacking and military success.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. "Societies that lack mediation . . . appear to be the simplest societies. None of them has writing or any substantial degree of specialization" (165)Schwartz, Richard D. - Legal evolution and societal complexity, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study explores the relationship between level of legal evolution (measured on a Guttman scale that ranges from just mediation to counsel, police, and mediation) and level of societal complexity. Results suggest a significant association between level of legal evolution and level of societal complexity.

    Related HypothesesCite