Found 2371 Hypotheses across 238 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. "When technology, as measured by subsistence economy is held constant . . . [and we] cross tabulate familial complexity with . . . [permanence of settlement and with stratification] . . . correlations [are] nonsignificant . . . at all levels of technology" (909)Blumberg, Rae Lesser - Societal complexity and familial complexity: evidence for the curvilinear h..., 1972 - 4 Variables

    This study investigates the relationship between societal complexity and familial complexity. Results suggest that the relationship is somewhat curvilinear; that is, in simpler societies more societal complexity is associated with a larger familial system, but the most developed societies have smaller familial systems. The demographic, economic, and politcal correlates of maximum family size are discussed.

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  2. "We find a curvilinear relationship . . . between familial complexity and each of the four aspects of . . . societal complexity . . . mean size of local community, permanence of settlement, stratification, and . . . levels of jurisdictional hierarchy" (907, 908, 909)Blumberg, Rae Lesser - Societal complexity and familial complexity: evidence for the curvilinear h..., 1972 - 5 Variables

    This study investigates the relationship between societal complexity and familial complexity. Results suggest that the relationship is somewhat curvilinear; that is, in simpler societies more societal complexity is associated with a larger familial system, but the most developed societies have smaller familial systems. The demographic, economic, and politcal correlates of maximum family size are discussed.

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  3. "Familial complexity cross tabulated with . . . subsistence complexity shows . . .substantial curvilinearity or nonmonotonicity" (906)Blumberg, Rae Lesser - Societal complexity and familial complexity: evidence for the curvilinear h..., 1972 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the relationship between societal complexity and familial complexity. Results suggest that the relationship is somewhat curvilinear; that is, in simpler societies more societal complexity is associated with a larger familial system, but the most developed societies have smaller familial systems. The demographic, economic, and politcal correlates of maximum family size are discussed.

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  4. "[For] a strong test of our curvilinear hypothesis we . . . applied [Marsh's Index of Differentiation], a single societal complexity measure . . . to [familial complexity] covering the range . . . from hunting and gathering to modern urban-industrial" (918)Blumberg, Rae Lesser - Societal complexity and familial complexity: evidence for the curvilinear h..., 1972 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the relationship between societal complexity and familial complexity. Results suggest that the relationship is somewhat curvilinear; that is, in simpler societies more societal complexity is associated with a larger familial system, but the most developed societies have smaller familial systems. The demographic, economic, and politcal correlates of maximum family size are discussed.

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  5. "The limited family [nuclear, stem and lineal] is found with complexity of economy, of stratification, and of settlement pattern; this type of family is associated with monogamous marriage and small family size" (304)Osmond, Marie W. - A cross-cultural analysis of family organization, 1969 - 6 Variables

    This study uses a multiple regression analysis to examine the relationship between society type and several variables of societal organization. Results suggest that limited family type is more likely to be found in complex societies.

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  6. "The table shows that nuclear household societies with a high degree of complexity do not involve their women in subsistence pursuits, and at the same time employ Type II instruction [deliberate instruction by non-kin without change of residence]; it shows the reverse for nuclear societies with low complexity" (332)Herzog, John D. - Deliberate instruction and household structure: a cross-cultural study, 1962 - 4 Variables

    This study examines relationships among the instruction of children, household type and size, and political integration. Particular attention is paid to type of instruction--whether the instructor is kin or non-kin, and whether the instruction requires a change in the child's residence. Different types of instruction are theorized to solve problems for children in different household types (e.g. children in mother-child households experience gender identity conflict, and so leave their houses for instruction from non-kin). The causality between instruction and societal complexity is also discussed.

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  7. ". . . increasing political complexity at higher levels [will] entail more . . . delegation of authority and increased delegation of authority [will] be handled by creating new administrative levels within the village" (47)Befu, Harumi - Political complexity and village community: test of an hypothesis, 1966 - 3 Variables

    This article examines how an increase in overall societal complexity affects local political offices. Findings suggest that a more complex society has a slight tendency to develop more political offices within the community, but there is greater support for an increased number of jurisdictional levels within the community.

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  8. Family complexity will be positively associated with socialization toward conformity (p. 393).Ellis, Godfrey J. - Supervision and conformity: a cross-cultural analysis of parental socializat..., 1978 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates child socialization toward obedience and conformity as a function of the supervision that parents experience in their own lives. Measures of economic, familial, political, and religious supervision in parents' lives are examined.

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  9. Certain characteristics of societies will be significantly correlated in the same direction in both of Murdock's data sets.Rudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples ..., 1995 - 55 Variables

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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  10. "Reported differences in personality descriptions among mixed farmers and pastoralists may be a result of a constellation of differences linked to the two types of economies" (295).Cone, Cynthia A. - Personality and subsistence: is the child the parent of the person?, 1979 - 7 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between personality traits and subsistence type in mixed farming and pastoralists societies. Findings suggest that differences in child socialization do not significantly predict personality differences in mixed farming and pastoralist societies as much as one would expect. Adult experiences should be considered as better predictors of personality traits.

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