Found 4359 Hypotheses across 436 Pages (0.004 seconds)
  1. Simpler societies are more likely to have humor with practical jokes, much aggression, and imitation (158).Alford, Finnegan - A holo-cultural study of humor, 1981 - 0 Variables

    This article presents a variety of findings regarding the nature and characteristics of humor and humorists, cross-culturally. It is a thorough preliminary study on the topic with a review of other work on humor and and outline of areas to be addressed by future research.

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  2. The more complex the society, the more humor about stupidity and pretension (156).Alford, Finnegan - A holo-cultural study of humor, 1981 - 0 Variables

    This article presents a variety of findings regarding the nature and characteristics of humor and humorists, cross-culturally. It is a thorough preliminary study on the topic with a review of other work on humor and and outline of areas to be addressed by future research.

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  3. The more complex the society, the more there are clowns and jesters (161).Alford, Finnegan - A holo-cultural study of humor, 1981 - 0 Variables

    This article presents a variety of findings regarding the nature and characteristics of humor and humorists, cross-culturally. It is a thorough preliminary study on the topic with a review of other work on humor and and outline of areas to be addressed by future research.

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  4. The more restrictive the cultural sphere regarding the body, the less humor about body parts (162).Alford, Finnegan - A holo-cultural study of humor, 1981 - 5 Variables

    This article presents a variety of findings regarding the nature and characteristics of humor and humorists, cross-culturally. It is a thorough preliminary study on the topic with a review of other work on humor and and outline of areas to be addressed by future research.

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  5. The more sexual restrictiveness, the less humor about sex (155).Alford, Finnegan - A holo-cultural study of humor, 1981 - 0 Variables

    This article presents a variety of findings regarding the nature and characteristics of humor and humorists, cross-culturally. It is a thorough preliminary study on the topic with a review of other work on humor and and outline of areas to be addressed by future research.

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  6. Humor is a cultural universal (162).Alford, Finnegan - A holo-cultural study of humor, 1981 - 1 Variables

    This article presents a variety of findings regarding the nature and characteristics of humor and humorists, cross-culturally. It is a thorough preliminary study on the topic with a review of other work on humor and and outline of areas to be addressed by future research.

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  7. Personal pride is positively associated with valuation by others in the same communitySznycer, Daniel - Invariances in the architecture of pride across small-scale societies, 2018 - 2 Variables

    Using experimental methods, these researchers evaluated the function of pride in ten small-scale societies by testing personal pride’s association with valuation by the surrounding community. Their aim was to see if findings from western(-ized), educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD) societies replicate in non-WEIRD societies. Simple linear regression in each society indicates that the amount of pride one feels for a given action closely matches how highly others in the same community value the action. Authors conclude support for the universality of the pride system.

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  8. "Societies without evidence of a sex difference [in drinking] tended to be higher in hostility change, in sociability intensity, availability of alcoholic beverages, procurement effort and extent of problem" (57)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 6 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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  9. "There is a positive correlation between male narcissism on the one hand, and pressure for the child to achieve, anxiety over failure to achieve and frequency of achievement behavior on the other" (255)Slater, Philip E. - Maternal ambivalence and narcissism: a cross-cultural study, 1965 - 4 Variables

    This article explores narcissism and child-rearing. The author presents a theory that, if a society’s structural pattern weakens the marital bond, the mother will be ambivalent toward the son who consequently will become narcissistic. This process would reinforce itself as it is repeated by each generation.

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  10. Personal pride is positively associated with valuation by others cross-culturallySznycer, Daniel - Invariances in the architecture of pride across small-scale societies, 2018 - 2 Variables

    Using experimental methods, these researchers evaluated the function of pride in ten small-scale societies by testing personal pride’s association with valuation by the surrounding community. Their aim was to see if findings from western(-ized), educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD) societies replicate in non-WEIRD societies. Simple linear regression in each society indicates that the amount of pride one feels for a given action closely matches how highly others in the same community value the action. Authors conclude support for the universality of the pride system.

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