Found 3921 Hypotheses across 393 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Adultery is positively associated with conjugal dissolution (658).Betzig, Laura L. - Causes of conjugal dissolution: a cross-cultural study, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This study focuses on predictors of divorce, cross-culturally. Variables measuring infidelity, infertility, personality, economy, kin, absence, health, ritual and politics are tested. An evolutionary/adaptionist approach is found to be most useful in explaining the nature of conjugal dissolution cross-culturally.

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  2. Economics, most notably inadequate support, is positively associated with conjugal dissolution (664)Betzig, Laura L. - Causes of conjugal dissolution: a cross-cultural study, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This study focuses on predictors of divorce, cross-culturally. Variables measuring infidelity, infertility, personality, economy, kin, absence, health, ritual and politics are tested. An evolutionary/adaptionist approach is found to be most useful in explaining the nature of conjugal dissolution cross-culturally.

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  3. As groups increase in size and hierarchical complexity, individuals in power will exploit their positions to resolve conflicts of interest within the group asymmetrically (210).Betzig, Laura L. - Despotism and differential reproduction: a cross-cultural correlation of con..., 1982 - 3 Variables

    This article uses a Darwinian approach, predicting that hierarchies persist and increase in social evolution because they increase fitness for individuals at higher levels within the hierarchy who choose to further social assymetry and benefit their fitness at the expense of the greater group. Polygyny is used as the indicator of fitness. Correlations tested support the hypothesis.

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  4. As groups increase in size and hierarchical complexity, individuals in power will use their asymmetrical advantage to collect perquisites as third parties and a proportionate amount of polygynous relationships (210).Betzig, Laura L. - Despotism and differential reproduction: a cross-cultural correlation of con..., 1982 - 4 Variables

    This article uses a Darwinian approach, predicting that hierarchies persist and increase in social evolution because they increase fitness for individuals at higher levels within the hierarchy who choose to further social assymetry and benefit their fitness at the expense of the greater group. Polygyny is used as the indicator of fitness. Correlations tested support the hypothesis.

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  5. "The data . . . Do not support the hypothesis of positive associations between . . . polygyny and . . . Sterility or childlessness" (96)Nag, Moni - Factors affecting human fertility in nonindustrial societies: a cross-cultu..., 1962 - 2 Variables

    Focusing on 61 preindustrial societies that have information on fertility, the author asks what factors may explain variation in fertility, what devices are used to control fertility, and whether differences in fertility appear to be in line with the societies' environments.

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  6. Women will be more likely to be blamed for childlessness than men (227).Rosenblatt, Paul C. - A cross-cultural study of responses to childlessness, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates responses to childlessness in a cross-cultural sample. Solutions to childlessness appear universal, and magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions seem the most likely to be tried first. Empirical analysis also shows that women are blamed for childlessness more often than men, which the authors suggest could be due to women’s lower status.

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  7. Magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions to childlessness will be more likely to be tried first than adoption or fosterage, divorce, or polygyny (224-5).Rosenblatt, Paul C. - A cross-cultural study of responses to childlessness, 1973 - 1 Variables

    This study investigates responses to childlessness in a cross-cultural sample. Solutions to childlessness appear universal, and magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions seem the most likely to be tried first. Empirical analysis also shows that women are blamed for childlessness more often than men, which the authors suggest could be due to women’s lower status.

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  8. "Our data support the hypothesis that there is a negative association between the incidence of sterility and fertility" (122)Nag, Moni - Factors affecting human fertility in nonindustrial societies: a cross-cultu..., 1962 - 2 Variables

    Focusing on 61 preindustrial societies that have information on fertility, the author asks what factors may explain variation in fertility, what devices are used to control fertility, and whether differences in fertility appear to be in line with the societies' environments.

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  9. There will be a higher rate of transition from uxorilocality to virilocality than the inverse transition.Fortunato, Laura - Your place or mine? A phylogenetic comparative analysis of marital residence..., 2010 - 2 Variables

    Aiming to better understand human demographic and dispersal history, the study uses Bayesian phylogenetic comparative methods to trace post-marital residence and cultural changes among 27 Indo-European and 135 Austronesian languages. They suggest that changes from uxorilocality to other types of residences (neolocality and virolocality) are more common than the inverse transitions. The results are generally supported with one exception: Austronesian societies have a higher rate of transition from neolocality to uxorilocality (1.5) than the other way around (0.9). Other relevant findings are that proto-Indo-European societies tend to follow virilocality, while proto-Malayo-Polynesian uxorilocality. There is a commonality for both language families to present instability of uxorilocality and unusual loss of uxorilocality.

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  10. There will be a higher rate of transition from uxorilocality to neolocality than the inverse transition.Fortunato, Laura - Your place or mine? A phylogenetic comparative analysis of marital residence..., 2010 - 2 Variables

    Aiming to better understand human demographic and dispersal history, the study uses Bayesian phylogenetic comparative methods to trace post-marital residence and cultural changes among 27 Indo-European and 135 Austronesian languages. They suggest that changes from uxorilocality to other types of residences (neolocality and virolocality) are more common than the inverse transitions. The results are generally supported with one exception: Austronesian societies have a higher rate of transition from neolocality to uxorilocality (1.5) than the other way around (0.9). Other relevant findings are that proto-Indo-European societies tend to follow virilocality, while proto-Malayo-Polynesian uxorilocality. There is a commonality for both language families to present instability of uxorilocality and unusual loss of uxorilocality.

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