Found 4279 Hypotheses across 428 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Number and intensity of animal food taboos decrease with political and economic complexity.Human Relations Area Files - A cross-cultural study of protein consumption: the role of cultural taboos i..., 1961 - 3 Variables

    This study was designed to determine whether there is a significant correlation between the number (or intensity) of restrictions on consumption of animal protein and a low level of animal protein. Findings do not support a correlation.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. "Factor III, Hostility Associated with Drinking, is primarily weighted on: typical intensity of hostility, extent of change in hostility, occurrence of extreme hostility" (27)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: i. descriptive measurements of drinking..., 1965 - 4 Variables

    Factor analysis is employed to examine variables related to alcohol consumption. Hypotheses related to the integration of drinking, inebriety, aggression while intoxicated, and quantity of drinking are examined.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. "Societies without evidence of a sex difference [in drinking] tended to be higher in hostility change, in sociability intensity, availability of alcoholic beverages, procurement effort and extent of problem" (57)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 6 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. "Societies with sex differences [in drinking] tend to have a nomadic or rural settlement pattern, economy based on hunting, less accumulation of food resources, stronger child training toward achievement and more punishment of child for failure to achieve" (59)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 6 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. Social synergy will be negatively associated with interpersonal intensity, competition, aggression, and psychological distress (453).Gorney, Roderic - Cultural determinants of achievement, aggression, and psychological distress, 1980 - 5 Variables

    This study examines the interrelationships between achievement, aggression, psychological distress, competition and interpersonal behavior. Authors suggest that levels of achievement, aggression, and psychological distress are partly determined by corresponding levels of of competition and interpersonal intensity. Hypotheses are supported.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. Interpersonal intensity and competition will be positively associated with achievement (indexed by social complexity), aggression, and psychological distress, as well as with one another (453).Gorney, Roderic - Cultural determinants of achievement, aggression, and psychological distress, 1980 - 5 Variables

    This study examines the interrelationships between achievement, aggression, psychological distress, competition and interpersonal behavior. Authors suggest that levels of achievement, aggression, and psychological distress are partly determined by corresponding levels of of competition and interpersonal intensity. Hypotheses are supported.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. "Societies with a definite sex difference were preponderantly higher than those without evidence of a sex difference in frequency of ceremonial drinking and tended to be higher in frequency of religious drinking and in approval of drinking" (57)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 4 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. "Societies with a definite sex difference [in drinking alcohol tend to be societies where] alcohol was used aboriginally rather than being use postcontact" (56)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. "Societies without evidence of a sex difference [in drinking] tend to be higher inavailability of alcoholic beverages" (58)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. As groups increase in size and hierarchical complexity, individuals in power will exploit their positions to resolve conflicts of interest within the group asymmetrically (210).Betzig, Laura L. - Despotism and differential reproduction: a cross-cultural correlation of con..., 1982 - 3 Variables

    This article uses a Darwinian approach, predicting that hierarchies persist and increase in social evolution because they increase fitness for individuals at higher levels within the hierarchy who choose to further social assymetry and benefit their fitness at the expense of the greater group. Polygyny is used as the indicator of fitness. Correlations tested support the hypothesis.

    Related HypothesesCite