Found 1594 Hypotheses across 160 Pages (0.032 seconds)
  1. Languages with larger speaker populations, greater geographical coverage, and greater contact with other languages (i.e. exoteric rather than esoteric languages) will have overall simpler morphological systems (1, 3, 6).Lupyan, Gary - Language structure is partly determined by social structure, 2010 - 2 Variables

    This article explores the relationship between language structure and social environment, positing that linguistic factors such as morphological complexity are associated with demographic/socio-historical factors such as number of speakers, geographic spread, and degree of language contact. Data support such an association. The authors further propose a Linguistic Niche Hypothesis suggesting that “the level of morphological specialization is a product of languages adapting to the learning constraints and the unique communicative needs of the speaker population” (7).

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  2. "There is a positive correlation between maternal sexual deprivation and male narcissism" (255)Slater, Philip E. - Maternal ambivalence and narcissism: a cross-cultural study, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This article explores narcissism and child-rearing. The author presents a theory that, if a society’s structural pattern weakens the marital bond, the mother will be ambivalent toward the son who consequently will become narcissistic. This process would reinforce itself as it is repeated by each generation.

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  3. "There is a positive correlation between male narcissism and close physical mother/son contact during (mother's sexual) deprivation" (255)Slater, Philip E. - Maternal ambivalence and narcissism: a cross-cultural study, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This article explores narcissism and child-rearing. The author presents a theory that, if a society’s structural pattern weakens the marital bond, the mother will be ambivalent toward the son who consequently will become narcissistic. This process would reinforce itself as it is repeated by each generation.

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  4. "There is a negative correlation between male narcissism and nurturant indulgence or gratification of infants" (255)Slater, Philip E. - Maternal ambivalence and narcissism: a cross-cultural study, 1965 - 4 Variables

    This article explores narcissism and child-rearing. The author presents a theory that, if a society’s structural pattern weakens the marital bond, the mother will be ambivalent toward the son who consequently will become narcissistic. This process would reinforce itself as it is repeated by each generation.

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  5. "There is a positive correlation between male narcissism and a distant or dissentient marital relationship" (255)Slater, Philip E. - Maternal ambivalence and narcissism: a cross-cultural study, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This article explores narcissism and child-rearing. The author presents a theory that, if a society’s structural pattern weakens the marital bond, the mother will be ambivalent toward the son who consequently will become narcissistic. This process would reinforce itself as it is repeated by each generation.

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  6. "There is a positive correlation between male narcissism on the one hand, and pressure for the child to achieve, anxiety over failure to achieve and frequency of achievement behavior on the other" (255)Slater, Philip E. - Maternal ambivalence and narcissism: a cross-cultural study, 1965 - 4 Variables

    This article explores narcissism and child-rearing. The author presents a theory that, if a society’s structural pattern weakens the marital bond, the mother will be ambivalent toward the son who consequently will become narcissistic. This process would reinforce itself as it is repeated by each generation.

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  7. "Males in narcissistic societies would show a generalized fear of women and would . . . marry late" (254)Slater, Philip E. - Maternal ambivalence and narcissism: a cross-cultural study, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This article explores narcissism and child-rearing. The author presents a theory that, if a society’s structural pattern weakens the marital bond, the mother will be ambivalent toward the son who consequently will become narcissistic. This process would reinforce itself as it is repeated by each generation.

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  8. Grammatical features of language tend to change at a slower rate than basic vocabulary.Greenhill, Simon J. - Evolutionary dynamics of language systems, 2017 - 2 Variables

    How do subsystems of language evolve over time? It is commonly assumed that grammatical changes of language are slower than vocabulary changes. Using a Dirichlet process mixture model to analyze rates of language evolution in 81 Austronesian languages, the authors find that to the contrary, the grammatical features of language tend to change at a faster rate than basic vocabulary. Furthermore, their results show that grammatical features have higher rates of homoplasy, more frequent contact-induced change, and less deliberate differentiation than basic vocabulary.

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  9. Grammatical features have higher rates of homoplasy than basic vocabulary.Greenhill, Simon J. - Evolutionary dynamics of language systems, 2017 - 2 Variables

    How do subsystems of language evolve over time? It is commonly assumed that grammatical changes of language are slower than vocabulary changes. Using a Dirichlet process mixture model to analyze rates of language evolution in 81 Austronesian languages, the authors find that to the contrary, the grammatical features of language tend to change at a faster rate than basic vocabulary. Furthermore, their results show that grammatical features have higher rates of homoplasy, more frequent contact-induced change, and less deliberate differentiation than basic vocabulary.

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  10. Grammatical features exhibit less schismogenesis than basic vocabulary.Greenhill, Simon J. - Evolutionary dynamics of language systems, 2017 - 2 Variables

    How do subsystems of language evolve over time? It is commonly assumed that grammatical changes of language are slower than vocabulary changes. Using a Dirichlet process mixture model to analyze rates of language evolution in 81 Austronesian languages, the authors find that to the contrary, the grammatical features of language tend to change at a faster rate than basic vocabulary. Furthermore, their results show that grammatical features have higher rates of homoplasy, more frequent contact-induced change, and less deliberate differentiation than basic vocabulary.

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