Found 2975 Hypotheses across 298 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Brides and their parents are expected to have a greater net gain in resources at the time of marriage than grooms and their parents, respectively (354).Huber, Brad R. - New cross-cultural perspectives on marriage transactions, 2011 - 1 Variables

    This article refines previous research on marriage transactions and offers descriptions of new types of marriage transactions. First, the authors examine the frequency and distribution of marriage transactions. Second,the authors use a bio-cultural approach to examine how differences in male and female reproductive strategies and the kin selection theory are associated with marriage transactions.

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  2. Polygyny and patrilaterality are predicted to be positively related to the net number of marriage transactions of brides and their parents and negatively related to the net number of marriage transactions of grooms and their parents (363).Huber, Brad R. - New cross-cultural perspectives on marriage transactions, 2011 - 3 Variables

    This article refines previous research on marriage transactions and offers descriptions of new types of marriage transactions. First, the authors examine the frequency and distribution of marriage transactions. Second,the authors use a bio-cultural approach to examine how differences in male and female reproductive strategies and the kin selection theory are associated with marriage transactions.

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  3. At the time of marriage, wealth is generally transferred from the groom’s family to the bride’s and from the couple’s parents to the bride and groom (288).Huber, Brad R. - Material resource investments at marriage: evolutionary, social, and ecologi..., 2011 - 1 Variables

    This article focuses on parents’ investment of material resources at the time of their child’s marriage. Two patterns emerge from the data: wealth is generally transferred from the groom’s family to the bride’s and from the couple’s parents to the bride and groom. Social and ecological factors are also examined. Multiple regression analysis shows that paternal confidence level, societal polygyny rate, and level of pathogen stress can affect the aforementioned wealth transfer patterns.

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  4. Paternal confidence level, polygyny rate, level of pathogen stress, relative age of spouses, and divorce rate will be positively associated with wealth transfer to the bride and her parents (284-6).Huber, Brad R. - Material resource investments at marriage: evolutionary, social, and ecologi..., 2011 - 6 Variables

    This article focuses on parents’ investment of material resources at the time of their child’s marriage. Two patterns emerge from the data: wealth is generally transferred from the groom’s family to the bride’s and from the couple’s parents to the bride and groom. Social and ecological factors are also examined. Multiple regression analysis shows that paternal confidence level, societal polygyny rate, and level of pathogen stress can affect the aforementioned wealth transfer patterns.

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  5. Male kin will provide more indirect care than direct care during birth (p. 201).Huber, Brad R. - Evolutionary theory, kinship, and childbirth in cross-cultural perspective, 2007 - 2 Variables

    Using an evolutionary perspective, this study tests hypotheses relating gender and kinship roles to the amount of direct and indirect care provided during and around childbirth. The roles of paternal certainty, residence rules and descent groups are also examined.

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  6. Female kin (grandmothers and aunts) will provide more direct and indirect care than male kin (grandfathers and uncles) (p. 201).Huber, Brad R. - Evolutionary theory, kinship, and childbirth in cross-cultural perspective, 2007 - 3 Variables

    Using an evolutionary perspective, this study tests hypotheses relating gender and kinship roles to the amount of direct and indirect care provided during and around childbirth. The roles of paternal certainty, residence rules and descent groups are also examined.

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  7. Direct and indirect care investments by biologically uncertain kin are positively associated with a society's paternity certainty level (p. 207).Huber, Brad R. - Evolutionary theory, kinship, and childbirth in cross-cultural perspective, 2007 - 4 Variables

    Using an evolutionary perspective, this study tests hypotheses relating gender and kinship roles to the amount of direct and indirect care provided during and around childbirth. The roles of paternal certainty, residence rules and descent groups are also examined.

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  8. Direct and indirect care investments by biologically uncertain kin are largest in patrilateral societies (p. 207).Huber, Brad R. - Evolutionary theory, kinship, and childbirth in cross-cultural perspective, 2007 - 4 Variables

    Using an evolutionary perspective, this study tests hypotheses relating gender and kinship roles to the amount of direct and indirect care provided during and around childbirth. The roles of paternal certainty, residence rules and descent groups are also examined.

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  9. Societies requiring a bride price at marriage should tend to have a higher proportion of bridetheft than those where considerations at marriage are less substantial (242)Ayres, Barbara - Bride theft and raiding for wives in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This article seeks to examine the distribution and frequency of bride-theft. Tylor's (1889) findings between various forms of marriage by capture and certain other social instituions are confirmed.

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  10. "Although bride theft is somewhat more likely to occur in societies with general polygyny than in societies with limited polygyny or monogamy, the majority (63 percent) of societies with general polygyny do not have bride theft" (241)Ayres, Barbara - Bride theft and raiding for wives in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This article seeks to examine the distribution and frequency of bride-theft. Tylor's (1889) findings between various forms of marriage by capture and certain other social instituions are confirmed.

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