Found 2851 Hypotheses across 286 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Patrilocality will be positively associated with men's training for obedience (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  2. Males will be trained to demonstrate more competitive behaviors useful for resource acquisition and control (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  3. More polygyny will be associated with training boys to strive more (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  4. More stratification will be positively associated with males' training to be industrious, and obedient and females' training to be sexually restrained and obedient. Stratification will be negatively associated with males and females' training to be self-reliant (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  5. Larger social group size will be associated with training that reduces intra-group conflict (p. 313).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  6. The socialization of female children is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males (4).Welch, Michael R. - Sex differences in the ease of socialization: an analysis of the efficiency ..., 1981 - 7 Variables

    This study examines differences in the ease of socialization for male and female children in preindustrial societies. Results support the hypothesis that the socialization of females is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males.

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  7. Low rainfall seasonality is associated with greater female inheritance of property (6)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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  8. Societies tend to socialize boys more into acheivement and self-reliance and girls more into nurturance, obedience, and responsibility (581).Hendrix, Lewellyn - Instrumental and expressive socialization: a false dichotomy, 1985 - 7 Variables

    This study reanalyzes the work of Barry, Bacon and Child (1957) on sex differences in child socialization. The authors use factor analysis to determine if the results of the original study are consistent with results yielded using modern methods and computer analysis. Authors find that there is no one general dimension of male-female difference in socialization and that the conclusions of Barry, Bacon, and Child have little meaning.

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  9. Pathogen load is negatively associated with female inheritance of property (6)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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  10. Animal husbandry is negatively associated with female inheritance of property (6)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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