Found 2765 Hypotheses across 277 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. The wealth-increasing polygyny complex: hypotheses relate a) autonomous wife and husband residence, b) norms and frequences of polygyny, c) wealth stratification of polygynists, d) female contribution to wealth, and e) a negative binomial distribution of polygyny (in which the addition of each wife increases the likelihood of adding another).White, Douglas R. - Rethinking polygyny: co-wives, codes, and cultural systems, 1988 - 1 Variables

    This article "focuses on internal relationships in the organization of polygynous systems." The author presents new codes for polygyny and tests hypotheses regarding "complexes" of polygynous variables: wealth-increasing polygyny and sororal polygyny. It is asserted that polygyny is produced by a variety of factors and circumstances, and that regional historical, demographic, and ecological forces require attention in order to understand its acceptance and practice.

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  2. Stratified agricultural economies will be associated with diminishing marginal fitness returns provided by additional polygynous wives which prevent men from having as many wives as their wealth might otherwise predict (2)Ross, Cody T. - Greater wealth inequality, less polygyny: rethinking the polygyny threshold ..., 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors reconsider the polygyny threshold model in order to account for the "polygyny paradox." This paradox, as the authors define it, is the trend away from polygyny as societies adopt stratified agricultural economies. This is despite an increase in both the importance of material wealth and greater leaves of wealth inequality both of which would otherwise suggest increased polygyny. The authors develop a new model that does account for this paradox.

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  3. Agricultural populations will show a reduced rate of polygyny and increased rates of monogamy relative to other subsistence systems (3)Ross, Cody T. - Greater wealth inequality, less polygyny: rethinking the polygyny threshold ..., 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors reconsider the polygyny threshold model in order to account for the "polygyny paradox." This paradox, as the authors define it, is the trend away from polygyny as societies adopt stratified agricultural economies. This is despite an increase in both the importance of material wealth and greater leaves of wealth inequality both of which would otherwise suggest increased polygyny. The authors develop a new model that does account for this paradox.

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  4. Stratified agricultural economies will be associated with an increased frequency of poor men lacking the resources to secure wives polygynously (1)Ross, Cody T. - Greater wealth inequality, less polygyny: rethinking the polygyny threshold ..., 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors reconsider the polygyny threshold model in order to account for the "polygyny paradox." This paradox, as the authors define it, is the trend away from polygyny as societies adopt stratified agricultural economies. This is despite an increase in both the importance of material wealth and greater leaves of wealth inequality both of which would otherwise suggest increased polygyny. The authors develop a new model that does account for this paradox.

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  5. In societies where females mainly weave, marriages will be polygynous and preferentially sororal (244, 129).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Polygyny, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  6. In societies that practice female initiation rites, marriages will be polygynous and preferentially sororal (244, 382).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Polygyny, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  7. In societies with high rates of avoidance for a son's wife, marriages will tend to not be polygynous and sororal (247, 258).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Polygyny, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  8. Polygyny will be positively associated with higher socialization for aggression (324)de Munck, Victor C. - Wife-husband intimacy and female status in cross-cultural perspective, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article examines predictors of intimacy between husbands and wives. Emphasis is on equality of spouses. A causal model is presented.

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  9. Accusations of witchcraft will be more likely to target women in societies where polygyny is common.Peacey, Sarah - Same-sex competition and sexual conflict expressed through witchcraft accusa..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    In this study, the authors analyze relationships between witchcraft accusations and the gender of the accused. They find that men are most often accused of witchcraft in their sample of 54 Bantu or Bantoid societies, and are particularly more likely to be accused of witchcraft by unrelated or blood-related individuals or in disputes over wealth or prestige. On the other hand, women are more likely to be accused of witchcraft in affinal relationships, particularly husbands and co-wives, and in situations related to fertility or relationships. Elderly women were also more likely to be accused of witchcraft than elderly men. The authors also examined outcomes of witchcraft accusations, finding that 81% of cases resulted in a negative outcome for the accused. They suggest that competition underlies accusations of witchcraft.

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  10. There is a covariance between the two outcome variables for polygyny, cultural rules constraining polygyny and percentage of married men who are polygynous.Minocher, Riana - Explaining marriage patterns in a globally representative sample through soc..., 2019 - 2 Variables

    Researchers examine marriage patterns of 186 societies from the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS). The eleven predictor variables are pathogen stress, arranged female marriages, population density, father roles during infancy, temperature, social stratification, wealth inequality, internal warfare, assault frequency, female agricultural contribution, and sex ratio. The two outcome variables measuring polygyny are cultural rules constraining polygyny and the percentage of married men who are polygynous. Controlling on phylogeny using a global supertree of the languages, analysis of marriage patterns reveals that assault frequency and pathogen stress are the strongest predictors of polygyny. These findings offer additional support for the theories of harem-defense polygyny and male genetic quality.

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