Found 4514 Hypotheses across 452 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Endemic violence will be negatively associated with monogamy (p. 214).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

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  2. Female economic importance will be negatively associated with monogamy (p. 214).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

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  3. Resource-poor environment will be positively associated with monogamy (p. 215)Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

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  4. Variability in male resource endowment will be negatively associated with monogamy (p. 213).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

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  5. Male mortality and social controls for parental certainty will be negatively associated with monogamy (p. 215).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 3 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

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  6. Extra-household division of labor will be postively associated with monogamy (p. 214).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

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  7. Marriage institutions will be more similar among societies closely related by language (vertical diffusion), and societies that are spacially proximate (horizontal diffusion) (135).Dow, Malcolm M. - Cultural trait transmission and missing data as sources of bias in cross-cul..., 2009 - 4 Variables

    This study retests the work by Ember, Ember and Low (2007) on male mortality and pathogen stress as predictors of nonsororal polygyny. The authors argue that the work of Ember, Ember, and Low is biased because it does not include a variable for cultural trait transmission. Restesting the original Ember, Ember and Low data, including a variable for cultural trait transmission, authors find that male mortality and pathogen stress loose their significance and cultural trait transmission is the only significant predictor of nonsororal polygyny.

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  8. Male contribution to subsistence will be negatively associated with percent of polygynous women among foragers (292-3).Marlowe, Frank W. - The mating system of foragers in the standard cross-cultural sample, 2003 - 3 Variables

    This article examines variation in polygyny among foragers. Empirical analysis suggests that the level of male provisioning influences mating systems: higher male contribution to subsistence is associated with monogamy. The influences of pathogen stress, male-male competition, and male coercion are also considered.

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  9. No hypotheses are tested in this article.Low, Bobbi S. - Pathogen intensity cross-culturally, 1994 - 1 Variables

    This article reviews prior findings associating sexual selection, polygyny, and pathogen stress. The author also presents descriptions of several pathogens to facilitate further research.

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  10. In state societies, pathogen stress will be associated with nonsororal polygynyEmber, Melvin - Comparing explanations of polygyny, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article uses logistic regression analysis to examine pathogen stress and male mortality in warfare as predictors of nonsororal polygyny. Differences between state and non-state societies are observed. The authors also retest variables from White and Burton's 1988 study on causes of polygyny, finding only fraternal interest groups and absence of plow significant.

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