Found 2211 Hypotheses across 222 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. "In societies where women make a minimal contribution to subsistence, food related activities become elaborated and are carried out within the household with an older woman in charge" (234).Brown, Judith K. - Being in charge: older women and their younger female kin, 1994 - 3 Variables

    A study of the relationship between older women and their young female kin. Relationships between women's relationships with their mother-in-laws and subsistence contribution, residence, descent, and food preparation are examined. Findings offer significant support for patterns in the relationship between older women and younger female kin.

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  2. "In those societies in which women make a major contribution to subsistence, food is produced by women working in groups and typically (but not always) an older woman is in charge" (234).Brown, Judith K. - Being in charge: older women and their younger female kin, 1994 - 3 Variables

    A study of the relationship between older women and their young female kin. Relationships between women's relationships with their mother-in-laws and subsistence contribution, residence, descent, and food preparation are examined. Findings offer significant support for patterns in the relationship between older women and younger female kin.

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  3. Cooking by women is associated with cooking by children of both genders (89)Bradley, Candice - Women's Power, Children's Labor, 1993 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates the sexual division of labor between adults and children. Data analysis suggests that children usually perform tasks appropriate for an adult of the same gender, but boys will often perform women’s tasks while girls generally do not perform men’s tasks. Thus, women tend to benefit more from children’s labor.

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  4. Processing technology or effort (as measured by women's food-labor diversity) is a determinant of production levels (importance of cassava in the diet) (p.105).Romanoff, Steven - Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african soci..., 1992 - 2 Variables

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  5. "In those societies in which the contribution of women to subsistence is minimal, and in which post-marital residence is patrilocal, and in which descent is patrilineal, mothers-in-law will confine young wives and monitor their behavior and mothers-in-law will be punitive" (233).Brown, Judith K. - Being in charge: older women and their younger female kin, 1994 - 6 Variables

    A study of the relationship between older women and their young female kin. Relationships between women's relationships with their mother-in-laws and subsistence contribution, residence, descent, and food preparation are examined. Findings offer significant support for patterns in the relationship between older women and younger female kin.

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  6. Male participation in soil preparation is associated with boy participation in soil preparation (86)Bradley, Candice - Women's Power, Children's Labor, 1993 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates the sexual division of labor between adults and children. Data analysis suggests that children usually perform tasks appropriate for an adult of the same gender, but boys will often perform women’s tasks while girls generally do not perform men’s tasks. Thus, women tend to benefit more from children’s labor.

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  7. Agricultural subsistence activity is associated with male contribution to subsistence (283).Martin, M. Kay - Female of the species, 1975 - 3 Variables

    This book discusses the role of women cross-culturally. The authors use a cross-cultural sample to examine the differences between men and women in contribution to subsistence as well as the social juxtaposition of the sexes in foraging, horticultural, agricultural, pastoral, and industrial societies.

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  8. Subsistence activities performed by males provides a greater proportion of the hunter-gatherer diet than those performed by females (183).Martin, M. Kay - Female of the species, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This book discusses the role of women cross-culturally. The authors use a cross-cultural sample to examine the differences between men and women in contribution to subsistence as well as the social juxtaposition of the sexes in foraging, horticultural, agricultural, pastoral, and industrial societies.

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  9. Spatially separated labor divided by gender is negatively related to women’s power in kinship networks. (100)Spain, Daphne - Gendered Space, 1992 - 2 Variables

    In this study, the author examines how gender-segregated space may affect the status of women in nonindustrial societies. Specifically, the author examines predictors of women's status in kinship, inheritance, and labor. The author argues that the gendered partitioning of space contributes to the subordination of women cross-culturally because these practices limit women's access to information which men use to gain status.

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  10. Female contribution to diet in horticultural groups will be negatively associated with dependence on cultigens (214).Martin, M. Kay - Female of the species, 1975 - 3 Variables

    This book discusses the role of women cross-culturally. The authors use a cross-cultural sample to examine the differences between men and women in contribution to subsistence as well as the social juxtaposition of the sexes in foraging, horticultural, agricultural, pastoral, and industrial societies.

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