Found 2946 Hypotheses across 295 Pages (0.044 seconds)
  1. "When women have more female allies, restrictive ideas about women's behavior should be relatively rare" (20).Yanca, Catherine - Female allies and female power a cross-cultural analysis, 2004 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the various ecological and social influences of women's political power and resource control in polygynous societies cross-culturally. Results suggest that women who are closer to their kin and have sisters as cowives are more likely to have resource control and power.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. In polygynous societies, ecological variables will affect women's access to female allies (19).Yanca, Catherine - Female allies and female power a cross-cultural analysis, 2004 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the various ecological and social influences of women's political power and resource control in polygynous societies cross-culturally. Results suggest that women who are closer to their kin and have sisters as cowives are more likely to have resource control and power.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. Degree of polygyny will be negatively associated with women's inheritance of property (6)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. Women’s contribution to subsistence will be positively associated with polygyny, exogamy, bridewealth, postpartum sex taboo, girls’ socialization for industriousness, positive evaluation of females, and premarital sexual permissiveness (145-7)Schlegel, Alice - The cultural consequences of female contribution to subsistence, 1986 - 9 Variables

    This study relates female contributions to a variety of social variables. The author divides responses to high female contribution to subsistence into two categories: adaptive (i.e. increased exogamy, polygyny, and bridewealth) and attitudinal (i.e. increased valuation of girls and premarital permissiveness). It is proposed that where women contribute more, “they are perceived less as objects for male sexual and reproductive needs and more as a person in their own right” (149).

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. Women's overt political power will be associated with group size, mobility, sex ratio, marriage system, male absence, ability to participate with men, female contribution to subsistence, level of political sovereignty, political organization hierarchy, and geographic region (70).Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, coalitions, and politics in preindustrial societies, 1992 - 10 Variables

    This article investigates possible correlates of women’s overt political power in a cross-cultural sample. Rule of descent—specifically, matrilineal or double descent— is the only factor the author found to be associated with women’s overt political power. Several other factors, including sex ratio, subsistence type, contribution to subsistence, and political system, are not associated. The author also includes a discussion of political activity among chimpanzees, as well as a brief ethnographic summary of several societies in which women have political power.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. Women’s power in marriage will be associated with matrilocal residence and descent (124).Warner, Rebecca L. - Social organization, spousal resources, and marital power: a cross-cultural ..., 1986 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the effect of family structural complexity, residence and descent system, and female contribution to subsistence on women's power in marriage. Results suggest that wives have more power in marriage where there is nuclear family organization and matrilocality. The authors suggest that resource theory should broaden its conception of valued resources to include dimensions such as family organization patterns.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. Polygyny will be related to women's ability to control resources (5)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. Women’s access to the shaman role will be positively associated with women’s power in kin networks and negatively associated with control of property (88).Welch, Michael R. - Female exclusion from religious roles: a cross-cultural test of competing ex..., 1982 - 3 Variables

    This article examines three theories regarding the lack of participation by women in community religious roles. Empirical analysis suggests that only resource theory has predictive power. Most clearly it suggests that women are more likely to be shamans in societies in which they are highly influential in kin networks but maintain minimal control of property. Neither gynephobia nor the presence of sex-differentiated social spheres appears associated with the prohibition of women’s participation in religious roles.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. "There is a 'functional cluster' of traits associated with monogamy in human societies" (134).Gray, J. Patrick - Correlates of monogamy in human groups: tests of some sociobiological hypotheses, 1984 - 4 Variables

    This study re-examines the hypotheses offered by Kleiman (1977) linking monogamy in humans to monogamy in other animals. Of seven hypotheses, only two were weakly supported when using a cross-cultural analysis.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. Women's ability to control resources produced by men will differ by marital residence (5).Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

    Related HypothesesCite