Found 3707 Hypotheses across 371 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Social complexity will be positively associated with greater occupational choice for women (207)Naroll, Maud - Women's occupational opportunities: a cross-cultural test, 1989 - 2 Variables

    A brief review of research on women's status is presented. Predictions are tested about women's choice of occupation in relation to levels of social complexity.

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  2. In societies where females are more dominant, there will be less restrictive extramarital sex norms (190).Broude, Gwen J. - Extramarital sex norms in cross-cultural perspective, 1980 - 4 Variables

    This study examines the double standard regarding extramarital norms for men and women in relation to other sociocultural factors. Results suggest that a double standard is significantly related to post-partum sex taboos, hypermasculinity, and father absence.

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  3. Extra-household division of labor will be postively associated with monogamy (p. 214).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

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  4. Female economic importance will be negatively associated with monogamy (p. 214).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

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  5. "Where women assume an extreme number of arduous agricultural tasks, with less male involvement, they perform fewer processing tasks" (p.107).Romanoff, Steven - Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african soci..., 1992 - 2 Variables

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  6. Findings: A factor analysis of traits used to develop a settlement pattern scale of cultural complexity yielded three important factors. Factor 6, "Economic" (oblique rotation), loaded heavily and positively on property, trade, and status variables (245)McNett, Charles W., Jr. - Factor analysis of a cross-cultural sample, 1973 - 6 Variables

    This study employs factor analysis to develop a settlement pattern scale of cultural complexity. Political, economic, and religious factors are identified and implications for the structure of the cultural system are discussed.

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  7. "Women who begin supplementary feeding of their infants before the age of one month participate to a greater degree in the subsistence activities of agriculture, hunting, fishing and animal husbandry than do women who begin supplementary feeding of their infants after one month" (210)Nerlove, Sara - Woman's workload and infant feeding practices: a relationship with demograp..., 1974 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the effect of infant care on women's contribution to subsistence. Results suggest that women who begin supplementary feeding of their infants early participate in subsistence activities to a greater degree than women who begin supplementary feedings later.

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  8. Extremely high male contribution to subsistence will be positively associated with patrilocality (335, 360).Korotayev, Andrey V. - Division of labor by gender and postmarital residence in cross-cultural pers..., 2003 - 2 Variables

    This article presents a review of theories relating postmarital residence with the gender division of labor. The author suggests that there will be an association between these two variables if societies with an extremely low female contribution to subsistence are contrasted with the rest of the world cultures. Results generally support this hypothesis.

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  9. Gathering by women is associated with gather by children of both genders (89)Bradley, Candice - Women's Power, Children's Labor, 1993 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates the sexual division of labor between adults and children. Data analysis suggests that children usually perform tasks appropriate for an adult of the same gender, but boys will often perform women’s tasks while girls generally do not perform men’s tasks. Thus, women tend to benefit more from children’s labor.

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  10. Cooking by women is associated with cooking by children of both genders (89)Bradley, Candice - Women's Power, Children's Labor, 1993 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates the sexual division of labor between adults and children. Data analysis suggests that children usually perform tasks appropriate for an adult of the same gender, but boys will often perform women’s tasks while girls generally do not perform men’s tasks. Thus, women tend to benefit more from children’s labor.

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