Found 4186 Hypotheses across 419 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions to childlessness will be more likely to be tried first than adoption or fosterage, divorce, or polygyny (224-5).Rosenblatt, Paul C. - A cross-cultural study of responses to childlessness, 1973 - 1 Variables

    This study investigates responses to childlessness in a cross-cultural sample. Solutions to childlessness appear universal, and magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions seem the most likely to be tried first. Empirical analysis also shows that women are blamed for childlessness more often than men, which the authors suggest could be due to women’s lower status.

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  2. Final ceremonies are more likely to occur with longer duration of mourning (94)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Grief and mourning in cross-cultural perspective, 1976 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates individual and group responses to death and the problems that death can create in a society. Several hypotheses regarding grief and mourning, as well as their variation with other societal variables, are supported with cross-cultural tests.

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  3. "Firstborn sons are likely to have more authority over siblings . . . than later born sons, are likely to inherit or otherwise gain control of more family land, livestock, or wealth, and are likely to be respected by siblings. . . . Firstborn daughters . . . receive relatively more respect than their same-sex siblings" (51)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Birth order in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 4 Variables

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  4. There are sex differences for emotion expressed by bereaved persons. Women cry significantly more frequently and average a higher frequency of self mutilation during bereavement than do men. But men were judged to have a significantly higher frequency of anger and aggression during bereavement than women (145, 146)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Grief and mourning in cross-cultural perspective, 1976 - 4 Variables

    This book investigates individual and group responses to death and the problems that death can create in a society. Several hypotheses regarding grief and mourning, as well as their variation with other societal variables, are supported with cross-cultural tests.

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  5. "Firstborn adult sons are more likely than average adult sons to have power or influence over other people, and they are more likely to head a kin group" (51)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Birth order in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  6. "Last borns tend to be more often spoiled or indulged [but it does not reach significance]" (51)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Birth order in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  7. "In societies with final funeral ceremonies, grief after the end of mourning is less likely to occur, the heavier the attendance at the final ceremony" (94)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Grief and mourning in cross-cultural perspective, 1976 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates individual and group responses to death and the problems that death can create in a society. Several hypotheses regarding grief and mourning, as well as their variation with other societal variables, are supported with cross-cultural tests.

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  8. "Where final ceremonies [for deceased] were present prolonged grief was less likely to be present or frequent; where final ceremonies were absent prolonged grief was more likely to be present and frequent" (93)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Grief and mourning in cross-cultural perspective, 1976 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates individual and group responses to death and the problems that death can create in a society. Several hypotheses regarding grief and mourning, as well as their variation with other societal variables, are supported with cross-cultural tests.

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  9. Of 7 measured inducements to attend final ceremonies, only 2 are associated with attendance: holding ceremonies for more than one death at a time and sex liberties at final ceremonies. Both correlations are based on a small number of cases (95)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Grief and mourning in cross-cultural perspective, 1976 - 7 Variables

    This book investigates individual and group responses to death and the problems that death can create in a society. Several hypotheses regarding grief and mourning, as well as their variation with other societal variables, are supported with cross-cultural tests.

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  10. Ritual specialists are more likely to be present in large scale societies with relatively permanent communities and in societies with rules for inheritance of real property. The importance of ritual specialists correlates negatively with temporary or permanent camp abandonment following a typical adult death (151)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Grief and mourning in cross-cultural perspective, 1976 - 4 Variables

    This book investigates individual and group responses to death and the problems that death can create in a society. Several hypotheses regarding grief and mourning, as well as their variation with other societal variables, are supported with cross-cultural tests.

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