Found 1966 Hypotheses across 197 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Hunters and gatherers will experience less frequent and drastic famine than other subsistence types (38).Dirks, Robert - Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis tests, 1993 - 3 Variables

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

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  2. Excluding specialized hunting groups, societies that rely heavily on gathering will experience less frequent and drastic famine (39).Dirks, Robert - Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis tests, 1993 - 4 Variables

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

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  3. Societies without formal class distinctions will experience famine less frequently and severely than societies with complex class systems (48).Dirks, Robert - Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis tests, 1993 - 3 Variables

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

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  4. Societies with trade entitlements will be more likely to experience famine (45).Dirks, Robert - Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis tests, 1993 - 2 Variables

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

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  5. "Societies that rank high on the valuation of children will also rank high on the frequency of famine" (36).Dirks, Robert - Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis tests, 1993 - 2 Variables

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

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  6. Famines will be more drastic where people are generally malnourished (50).Dirks, Robert - Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis tests, 1993 - 2 Variables

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

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  7. "Where direct entitlements are individualized, the risk of famine will be greater than where ownerships extend across a broad corporate base" (44).Dirks, Robert - Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis tests, 1993 - 2 Variables

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

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  8. Hunter-gatherers will experience more famine than those with other modes of subsistence (1).Berbesque, J. Colette - Hunter-gatherers have less famine than agriculturalists, 2014 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the common belief that hunter-gatherers suffer more famine than other subsistence types. Controlling for habitat quality, authors examine the relationship between famine and subsistence type and find that hunter-gatherers actually experience significantly less famine than other subsistence types.

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  9. In the prehistoric New World, the percentage of South American settlements in with a population over 400 will be positively associated with the same measure for Mesoamerican settlements 200 years earlier (9).Peregrine, Peter N. - Synchrony in the new world: an example of archaeoethnology, 2006 - 1 Variables

    This article employs archaeoethnology to investigate possible patterns of synchronous population growth among cities of the prehistoric New World. The author finds a pattern of settlement synchrony distinct from a pattern found in the prehistoric Old World, suggesting that global climate change may not be a key factor in understanding settlement synchrony. Macroregional political and economic processes such as long-distance trade are offered as partial explanations of settlement synchrony in the New World.

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  10. In the prehistoric New World, the percentage of North American settlements in with a population over 400 will be negatively associated with the same measure for Mesoamerican settlements 100 years earlier (9).Peregrine, Peter N. - Synchrony in the new world: an example of archaeoethnology, 2006 - 1 Variables

    This article employs archaeoethnology to investigate possible patterns of synchronous population growth among cities of the prehistoric New World. The author finds a pattern of settlement synchrony distinct from a pattern found in the prehistoric Old World, suggesting that global climate change may not be a key factor in understanding settlement synchrony. Macroregional political and economic processes such as long-distance trade are offered as partial explanations of settlement synchrony in the New World.

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