Found 1748 Hypotheses across 175 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. In infancy principal caretakers (other than the mother) are most likely to be female children or female adults (170).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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  2. In infancy the mother is most likely to be the principal caretaker (170).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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  3. In early childhood principal companions and caretakers are most likely to be the peer group or older children of either gender (170).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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  4. Mothers rearing children are unlikely to live in nuclear, neolocal households (173).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 3 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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  5. "In general, our hypothesis that mothers spend less time caring for their offspring when they have other people to help is confirmed . . ." (171)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  6. Children and adolescents do in less work when there is a higher dangerous mammal density and/or low water quality/quantity ratings.Lew-Levy, Sheina - Socioecology shapes child and adolescent time allocation in twelve hunter-ga..., 2022 - 6 Variables

    This paper seeks to understand the roles played by children and adolescents in hunter-gatherer societies in relation to their social and ecological context. The authors set out to investigate how environmental factors, ecological risk, and the energetic contributions of adult men and women to food production may have influenced children/adolescent allocation of time to child care, domestic work, food production, and play. In order to carry out this study, the authors logged the behaviors of 690 children and adolescents from twelve hunter-gatherer and mixed-subsistence societies (Agta, Aka, Baka, BaYaka, Dukha, Hadza, Matsi-genka, Maya, Mayangna, Mikea, Pume, and Tsimane), totaling 85,597 unique observations. The study found that harsh environmental factors were not associated with child/adolescent time allocation, but that local ecological risk such as dangerous animals and lack of water availability predicted decreased time allocation to child care and domestic work, and that increased adult female participation in food production was associated with less time invested in child care among boys. It also found that all gendered differences in time allocation among children were stronger when men made greater contributions to food production than women. The authors interpret these results to signify that parents may play a role in preparing their children for environmental and ecological difficulty in order to help them develop skills that will help them become useful community members as adults.

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  7. ". . . we hypothesized that mothers are more unstable [in mood] when they must spend large amounts of time caring for children" (171-172)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  8. "The two aspects of what may not be labeled 'absent-father family organization' have no empirical relation to initiation ceremonies when male solidarity is controlled" (386)Young, Frank W. - The function of male initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural test of an alte..., 1962 - 4 Variables

    This study investigates theories of male initiation ceremonies. The author examines a hypothesis related to child-rearing variables (sleeping arrangements and post-partum taboo) and rejects it based on empirical analysis. An alternative hypothesis related to male solidarity is offered.

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  9. "Societies where a nurturant presence was constantly present . . . were more likely to have the simplest local jurisdictional hierarchy" (7)Zern, David - Further evidence supporting the relationship between mother/infant contact a..., 1976 - 2 Variables

    Author reconsiders an earlier study on mother-infant contact and its possible effects on a society's language system. Focuses here on a different dependent variable--the society's local jurisdictional hierarchy.

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  10. Marital intimacy will be related to caretaking experiences in childhood (63).Broude, Gwen J. - The relationship of marital intimacy and aloofness to social environment: a ..., 1987 - 3 Variables

    This study explores the correlates of marital intimacy cross-culturally. Previous theories are challenged and a new measure of marital intimacy is presented. Findings suggest that marital intimacy is likely to occur in societies where individuals have no social support outside of marriage.

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