Found 1617 Hypotheses across 162 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. In infancy principal caretakers (other than the mother) are most likely to be female children or female adults (170).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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  2. In infancy the mother is most likely to be the principal caretaker (170).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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  3. In early childhood the child is likely to spend half or less of the time with the mother (170).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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  4. Mothers rearing children are unlikely to live in nuclear, neolocal households (173).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 3 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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  5. There will be a correlation between apology and early childhood companions and caretakers (290).Hickson, Letitia - The social contexts of apology in dispute settlement: a cross-cultural study, 1986 - 2 Variables

    This study focuses on apology as a mechanism for dispute management in relation to hierarchy and child socialization. Significant associations exist between both large, paramount chiefdoms and apology and between adults as caretakers in early childhood and apology.

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  6. Marital intimacy will be related to caretaking experiences in childhood (63).Broude, Gwen J. - The relationship of marital intimacy and aloofness to social environment: a ..., 1987 - 3 Variables

    This study explores the correlates of marital intimacy cross-culturally. Previous theories are challenged and a new measure of marital intimacy is presented. Findings suggest that marital intimacy is likely to occur in societies where individuals have no social support outside of marriage.

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  7. Peer contact in adolescence will be positively associated with peer contact in childhood (171).Schlegel, Alice - Adolescence: an anthropological inquiry, 1991 - 2 Variables

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  8. "Societies where a nurturant presence was constantly present . . . were more likely to have the simplest local jurisdictional hierarchy" (7)Zern, David - Further evidence supporting the relationship between mother/infant contact a..., 1976 - 2 Variables

    Author reconsiders an earlier study on mother-infant contact and its possible effects on a society's language system. Focuses here on a different dependent variable--the society's local jurisdictional hierarchy.

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  9. Corporal punishment of children will be more likely where warfare frequency is "more than rare" (615).Ember, Carol R. - Explaining corporal punishment of children: a cross-cultural study, 2005 - 6 Variables

    This article tests various explainations for corporal punishment of children, including social complexity, a societal culture of violence, and whether help in child rearing is available. Analysis suggests that corporal punishment may be a parent's way to prepare children for societal power inequality.

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  10. Children's objects are linked to adult material culture.Riede, Felix - Toys as Teachers: A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Object Use and Enskillment in..., 2023 - 1 Variables

    The article discusses the role of toys and tools in the development of skills and cultural transmission in hunter-gatherer societies. The authors present a cross-cultural inventory of objects made for and by hunter-gatherer children and adolescents, finding that toys and tools were primarily handled outside of explicit pedagogical contexts, and there is little evidence for formalised apprenticeships. The authors suggest that children's self-directed interactions with objects, especially during play, have a critical role in early-age enskillment. Both boys and girls tend to use objects in work and play that emulate the gendered division of labor in their communities, and many objects made by and for children had full-scale counterparts. Finally, the authors argue that the peer group is crucial to skill acquisition in hunter-gatherer societies.

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