Found 3873 Hypotheses across 388 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. In agricultural societies, male localization will be associated with male contribution to subsistence (10).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  2. In fully nomadic societies, male localization will be associated with male contribution to subsistence (11).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  3. In agricultural societies, female localization will be associated with female contribution to subsistence (16).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  4. In non-agricultural societies, female localization will be associated with female contribution to subsistence (15).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  5. Marginality of a foraging society will be associated with degree of male localization (28).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  6. Community size will be positively associated with degree of endogamy (26).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  7. There will be a negative association between polygyny and demand for male provisioning (3).Hooper, Paul L. - Explaining monogamy and polygyny among foragers and horticulturalists, 2006 - 3 Variables

    This article tests several hypotheses related to the presence or absence of polygyny. Results suggest a negative relationship between polygyny and male provisioning, and positive relationships between polygyny and warfare, interpersonal aggression, and pathogen stress.

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  8. "In those societies in which the contribution of women to subsistence is minimal, and in which post-marital residence is patrilocal, and in which descent is patrilineal, mothers-in-law will confine young wives and monitor their behavior and mothers-in-law will be punitive" (233).Brown, Judith K. - Being in charge: older women and their younger female kin, 1994 - 6 Variables

    A study of the relationship between older women and their young female kin. Relationships between women's relationships with their mother-in-laws and subsistence contribution, residence, descent, and food preparation are examined. Findings offer significant support for patterns in the relationship between older women and younger female kin.

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  9. "In those societies in which women make a major contribution to subsistence, food is produced by women working in groups and typically (but not always) an older woman is in charge" (234).Brown, Judith K. - Being in charge: older women and their younger female kin, 1994 - 3 Variables

    A study of the relationship between older women and their young female kin. Relationships between women's relationships with their mother-in-laws and subsistence contribution, residence, descent, and food preparation are examined. Findings offer significant support for patterns in the relationship between older women and younger female kin.

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  10. "In societies where women make a minimal contribution to subsistence, food related activities become elaborated and are carried out within the household with an older woman in charge" (234).Brown, Judith K. - Being in charge: older women and their younger female kin, 1994 - 3 Variables

    A study of the relationship between older women and their young female kin. Relationships between women's relationships with their mother-in-laws and subsistence contribution, residence, descent, and food preparation are examined. Findings offer significant support for patterns in the relationship between older women and younger female kin.

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