Found 3908 Hypotheses across 391 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. In non-agricultural societies, male localization will be associated with male contribution to subsistence (9).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  2. In fully nomadic societies, male localization will be associated with male contribution to subsistence (11).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  3. In agricultural societies, female localization will be associated with female contribution to subsistence (16).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  4. In non-agricultural societies, female localization will be associated with female contribution to subsistence (15).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  5. Marginality of a foraging society will be associated with degree of male localization (28).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  6. Community size will be positively associated with degree of endogamy (26).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  7. There will be a negative association between polygyny and demand for male provisioning (3).Hooper, Paul L. - Explaining monogamy and polygyny among foragers and horticulturalists, 2006 - 3 Variables

    This article tests several hypotheses related to the presence or absence of polygyny. Results suggest a negative relationship between polygyny and male provisioning, and positive relationships between polygyny and warfare, interpersonal aggression, and pathogen stress.

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  8. Father-in-law/daughter-in-law avoidance should be more likely to occur where there is household co-residence (243, 250)Witkowski, Stanley - A cross-cultural test of the proximity hypothesis, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This paper tests the proximity hypothesis (used by Murdock [1949]) which posits that residential propinquity will be associated with parent-in-law avoidance and kin terminology. Several operational hypotheses are tested but none are supported. The author suggests that this finding may cast doubt other hypotheses that underlie Murdock’s findings, such as the participation hypothesis.

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  9. "The residential proximity hypothesis suggests that institutionalized avoidance practices should be more likely to occur when the avoiding parties are living in the same household than when they are just living in the same community." [Mother-in-law/son-in-law avoidance increases with the degree of household co-residence] (249)Witkowski, Stanley - A cross-cultural test of the proximity hypothesis, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This paper tests the proximity hypothesis (used by Murdock [1949]) which posits that residential propinquity will be associated with parent-in-law avoidance and kin terminology. Several operational hypotheses are tested but none are supported. The author suggests that this finding may cast doubt other hypotheses that underlie Murdock’s findings, such as the participation hypothesis.

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  10. ". . . the degree of extended family organization--from large extended, to small extended, to nonextended--should be positively associated with the degree of collateral [kin terminology] merging" (253)Witkowski, Stanley - A cross-cultural test of the proximity hypothesis, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This paper tests the proximity hypothesis (used by Murdock [1949]) which posits that residential propinquity will be associated with parent-in-law avoidance and kin terminology. Several operational hypotheses are tested but none are supported. The author suggests that this finding may cast doubt other hypotheses that underlie Murdock’s findings, such as the participation hypothesis.

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