Found 4403 Hypotheses across 441 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. “Within any given society the level of aggression among the members of one sex tends to vary directly with the level of aggression other members of the other” (61, 64).Rohner, Ronald P. - Sex differences in aggression: phylogenetic and enculturation perspectives, 1976 - 2 Variables

    This article presents evidence suggesting that sex differences in aggression are universal, but that the differences are also highly susceptible to experiential modification. Following a “phylogenetic perspective” that emphasizes the interaction of genotype and experience, the author finds that boys are on average more aggressive than girls but adult males as a group are not significantly more aggressive than women.

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  2. There are sex differences in aggression in adulthood (64).Rohner, Ronald P. - Sex differences in aggression: phylogenetic and enculturation perspectives, 1976 - 2 Variables

    This article presents evidence suggesting that sex differences in aggression are universal, but that the differences are also highly susceptible to experiential modification. Following a “phylogenetic perspective” that emphasizes the interaction of genotype and experience, the author finds that boys are on average more aggressive than girls but adult males as a group are not significantly more aggressive than women.

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  3. ". . . parental rejection in children, as well as in adults who were rejected as children, leads to: hostility, aggression, passive aggression, or problems with the management of hostility and aggression . . ." (168)Rohner, Ronald P. - They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental..., 1975 - 2 Variables

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  4. Parental acceptance will be positively associated with higher self-esteem in childhood and adulthood, and with emotional responsiveness, emotional stability, generosity, nurturance, and better world view in adulthood (260).Rohner, Ronald P. - Parental acceptance-rejection and personality development: a universalist ap..., 1975 - 7 Variables

    This study investigates cross-cultural determinants and consequences of parental affection and rejection. Findings indicate that accepted children are less hostile and dependent and have higher self-esteem in both childhood and adulthood. Additional findings suggest that children who experienced parental acceptance had higher emotional responsiveness, better world view, more emotional stability, generosity, and nurturance as adults.

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  5. ". . . adults who were rejected as children tend pan-culturally to be emotionally unresponsive. . . . less emotionally stable. . . . [and to have a] negative world view . . ." (102, 103)Rohner, Ronald P. - They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental..., 1975 - 4 Variables

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  6. "Societies with a definite sex difference [in drinking alcohol tend to be societies where] alcohol was used aboriginally rather than being use postcontact" (56)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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  7. "Societies without evidence of a sex difference [in drinking] tend to be higher inavailability of alcoholic beverages" (58)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 2 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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  8. "Societies with sex differences [in drinking] tend to have a nomadic or rural settlement pattern, economy based on hunting, less accumulation of food resources, stronger child training toward achievement and more punishment of child for failure to achieve" (59)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 6 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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  9. Male aggression or beliefs that women are inferior will be positively associated with gender inequality in childhood and adulthood (65).Baunach, Dawn Michelle - Gender inequality in childhood: toward a life course perspective, 2001 - 4 Variables

    This article builds upon gender inequality theory to examine childhood gender inequality in preindustrial societies. Multivariate and cluster analysis are used.

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  10. "Societies with a definite sex difference were preponderantly higher than those without evidence of a sex difference in frequency of ceremonial drinking and tended to be higher in frequency of religious drinking and in approval of drinking" (57)Child, Irvin L. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differences, 1965 - 4 Variables

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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