Found 2259 Hypotheses across 226 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Frequency of warfare will be related to parental hostility, overall parental warmth, father-infant sleeping proximity, and socialization for aggression in boys in late childhood (632)Ember, Carol R. - War, socialization, and interpersonal violence: a cross-cultural study, 1994 - 5 Variables

    This study explores several correlates of interpersonal violence. Multiple regression analysis suggests that socialization for aggression in boys in late childhood is the strongest predictor of higher rates of homicide and assault. Path analysis suggests that socialization for aggression is a consequence, not a cause, of war.

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  2. In a subsample excluding societies that are matrilocal and have less than occasional warfare, father's sleeping distance will be a better predictor of homicide and assault (305).Ember, Carol R. - Father absence and male aggression: a re-examination of the comparative evidence, 2002 - 4 Variables

    This paper supports Beatrice B. Whiting's (1965) sex-identity conflict hypothesis which suggests a relationship between males' early identification with their mothers and male violence. Authors find that, in addition to socialization aggression, frequency of homicide/assault is significantly related to father-infant sleeping distance, particularly when residence is not matrilocal and/or warfare is more than occasional.

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  3. In addition to socialization for aggression, there will be a positive relationship between father's sleeping distance and the frequency of homocide/ assault (300).Ember, Carol R. - Father absence and male aggression: a re-examination of the comparative evidence, 2002 - 3 Variables

    This paper supports Beatrice B. Whiting's (1965) sex-identity conflict hypothesis which suggests a relationship between males' early identification with their mothers and male violence. Authors find that, in addition to socialization aggression, frequency of homicide/assault is significantly related to father-infant sleeping distance, particularly when residence is not matrilocal and/or warfare is more than occasional.

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  4. Aggression training will be positively associated with frequencies of homicide, assault, and war (630).Ember, Carol R. - War, socialization, and interpersonal violence: a cross-cultural study, 1994 - 3 Variables

    This study explores several correlates of interpersonal violence. Multiple regression analysis suggests that socialization for aggression in boys in late childhood is the strongest predictor of higher rates of homicide and assault. Path analysis suggests that socialization for aggression is a consequence, not a cause, of war.

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  5. Individual and socially organized aggression will be positively associated with frequency of war (628).Ember, Carol R. - War, socialization, and interpersonal violence: a cross-cultural study, 1994 - 3 Variables

    This study explores several correlates of interpersonal violence. Multiple regression analysis suggests that socialization for aggression in boys in late childhood is the strongest predictor of higher rates of homicide and assault. Path analysis suggests that socialization for aggression is a consequence, not a cause, of war.

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  6. Parental involvement will be negatively correlated with the prevalence of aggression (homicide and assault) (p. 171).Quinlan, Robert J. - Parenting and cultures of risk: a comparative analysis of infidelity, aggres..., 2007 - 3 Variables

    This study tests a broad "risk response" hypothesis: environmental risk can reduce parents' involvement and care which, through its effects on children's behavioral strategies later in life, ultimately produces a larger cultural model favoring risky behavior. Examinations of extramarital sex, aggression, theft, and witchcraft support this hypothesis, leading the authors to suggest that child development is the underpinning of cultural adaptation in the face of environmental change.

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  7. Conditions of socialization that increase the likelihood of protest masculinity will be positively associated with war (631).Ember, Carol R. - War, socialization, and interpersonal violence: a cross-cultural study, 1994 - 2 Variables

    This study explores several correlates of interpersonal violence. Multiple regression analysis suggests that socialization for aggression in boys in late childhood is the strongest predictor of higher rates of homicide and assault. Path analysis suggests that socialization for aggression is a consequence, not a cause, of war.

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  8. Warfare frequency will play a significant causal role in the etiology of interpersonal aggression (639).Ember, Carol R. - War, socialization, and interpersonal violence: a cross-cultural study, 1994 - 2 Variables

    This study explores several correlates of interpersonal violence. Multiple regression analysis suggests that socialization for aggression in boys in late childhood is the strongest predictor of higher rates of homicide and assault. Path analysis suggests that socialization for aggression is a consequence, not a cause, of war.

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  9. Mothers who raise their children in multiple family dwellings rather than in private dwellings will tend to be more controlled emotionally, as evidenced by low levels of warmth, hostility, praise, and punishment.Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 6 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  10. There will be a relationship between use of corporal punishment and frequency of homicide/assault (305).Ember, Carol R. - Father absence and male aggression: a re-examination of the comparative evidence, 2002 - 2 Variables

    This paper supports Beatrice B. Whiting's (1965) sex-identity conflict hypothesis which suggests a relationship between males' early identification with their mothers and male violence. Authors find that, in addition to socialization aggression, frequency of homicide/assault is significantly related to father-infant sleeping distance, particularly when residence is not matrilocal and/or warfare is more than occasional.

    Related HypothesesCite