Found 3444 Hypotheses across 345 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Environmental unpredictability is positively associated with the response of submission/flight to acts of capricious aggression in folktales (478)Cohen, Alex - A cross-cultural study of the effects of environmental unpredictability on a..., 1990 - 2 Variables

    Using a psychoanalytic-materialist approach, the author examines the possible effects of environmental unpredictability on the prevalence of unprovoked aggression by characters in folktales.

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  2. Social drinking will correlate positively with the fantasy themes of sex, aggression, and change of state.McClelland, David C. - A cross-cultural study of folk-tale content and drinking, 1972 - 4 Variables

    This book chapter tests new and pre-existing theories (Horton, Field, Bacon et al.) for the cause of variation in drinking across cultures. Folktale content is used to test psychological variables more directly than has been done previously. Folktale content is analyzed programmatically with an acknowledged error level of up to one-third. Results lend support to Field's 1962 theory that loose social organization facilitates drinking.

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  3. "The strategic mode of competition tends to be modeled in the folk tales of tribes which are politically complex" (193)Roberts, John M. - Strategy in games and folk tales, 1963 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the strategic mode of competition in both games of strategy and folk talkes. Various significant relationships between games of strategy, folktales, social complexity, and child rearing variables are observed.

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  4. "There is a relationship between strategic outcomes in [folk] tales and reward for obedience" (193)Roberts, John M. - Strategy in games and folk tales, 1963 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the strategic mode of competition in both games of strategy and folk talkes. Various significant relationships between games of strategy, folktales, social complexity, and child rearing variables are observed.

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  5. Societies that are high on the impulsive power scale will be more likely to have individuals act vigorously and attempt to impact others in folktales (84)Wanner, Eric - Power and inhibition: a revision of the magical potency theory, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter (4) follows up suggestions from a previous chapter (3) by McClelland et.al. that in non-solidary societies heavy drinking is associated with conflict about personal power and alcohol provides a way of acting out impulses aimed at impacting others. Support was found for this theory using an analysis of words in folktales.

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  6. Folktale types will be traceable to ancestral Indo-European populations. (2)Da Silva, Sara Graça - Comparative phylogenetic analyses uncover the ancient roots of Indo-European..., 2016 - 2 Variables

    The authors compare language phylogenies and spatial distributions with folktale frequencies of Indo-European peoples in order to reconstruct their cultural transmission. A stronger association is found between folktale frequency and language phylogeny than has been proposed in earlier literature studies, indicating that vertical transmission is more influential on folktale distribution than horizontal transmission through spatial proximity. Finally, the frequencies of certain folktales appear to trace the ancestral divergences of Indo-European languages to a much deeper level than previously though, suggesting that folktales are representative of broader features of culture, rather than recent literary inventions.

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  7. "…alcoholic societies may show some preoccupations in the oral mode" (62)McClelland, David C. - A cross-cultural study of folk-tale content and drinking, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter tests new and pre-existing theories (Horton, Field, Bacon et al.) for the cause of variation in drinking across cultures. Folktale content is used to test psychological variables more directly than has been done previously. Folktale content is analyzed programmatically with an acknowledged error level of up to one-third. Results lend support to Field's 1962 theory that loose social organization facilitates drinking.

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  8. "Barry, Bacon and Child dependency hypothesis: . . . people in drinking societies are basically dependent [on others]" (60)McClelland, David C. - A cross-cultural study of folk-tale content and drinking, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter tests new and pre-existing theories (Horton, Field, Bacon et al.) for the cause of variation in drinking across cultures. Folktale content is used to test psychological variables more directly than has been done previously. Folktale content is analyzed programmatically with an acknowledged error level of up to one-third. Results lend support to Field's 1962 theory that loose social organization facilitates drinking.

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  9. "Horton's subsistence anxiety hypothesis: . . . tribes which drink a lot worry more about food and being hungry" (59)McClelland, David C. - A cross-cultural study of folk-tale content and drinking, 1972 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter tests new and pre-existing theories (Horton, Field, Bacon et al.) for the cause of variation in drinking across cultures. Folktale content is used to test psychological variables more directly than has been done previously. Folktale content is analyzed programmatically with an acknowledged error level of up to one-third. Results lend support to Field's 1962 theory that loose social organization facilitates drinking.

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  10. "Societies possessing games of strategy tend to have folk tales in which the outcome is determined or partly determined by strategy" (193)Roberts, John M. - Strategy in games and folk tales, 1963 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the strategic mode of competition in both games of strategy and folk talkes. Various significant relationships between games of strategy, folktales, social complexity, and child rearing variables are observed.

    Related HypothesesCite