Found 3577 Hypotheses across 358 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Among hunter-gatherers, parents’ wealth (e.g. hunting resources, physical weight, or sharing partners) will be associated with children’s wealth (28).Smith, Eric Alden - Wealth transmission and inequality among hunter-gatherers, 2010 - 2 Variables

    This article examines whether intergenerational wealth transmission perpetuates inequality among hunter-gatherers. The authors consider three types of wealth: embodied, material, and relational. Empirical analysis of wealth transmission in five cultures suggests that, in many cases, a parent’s wealth is associated with a child’s life chances. Gini coefficients suggest that hunter-gatherer cultures have low to moderate wealth inequality overall: very low by current world standards but not non-existent.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. Social stratification will be associated with the origins and transmission of female genital modification. (174)Ross, Cody T. - The Origins and Maintenance of Female Genital Modification across Africa, 2016 - 2 Variables

    The researchers develop and compare two evolutionary models to evaluate the association between social stratification and female genital modification(FGMo) in a cross-cultural African sample, theorizing that social hierarchy creates competition for high-value males in which FGMo acts as a costly demonstration of paternity certainty. Although the null model outperforms the stratification model when applied to empirical data, an association between FGMo and stratification is found in the expected direction. The authors suggest that while stratification may be an important factor in the de novo origins of FGMo, spread and persistence of the practice subsequently become more heavily dependent on other selective forces.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. Stratified agricultural economies will be associated with an increased frequency of poor men lacking the resources to secure wives polygynously (1)Ross, Cody T. - Greater wealth inequality, less polygyny: rethinking the polygyny threshold ..., 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors reconsider the polygyny threshold model in order to account for the "polygyny paradox." This paradox, as the authors define it, is the trend away from polygyny as societies adopt stratified agricultural economies. This is despite an increase in both the importance of material wealth and greater leaves of wealth inequality both of which would otherwise suggest increased polygyny. The authors develop a new model that does account for this paradox.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. Stratified agricultural economies will be associated with diminishing marginal fitness returns provided by additional polygynous wives which prevent men from having as many wives as their wealth might otherwise predict (2)Ross, Cody T. - Greater wealth inequality, less polygyny: rethinking the polygyny threshold ..., 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors reconsider the polygyny threshold model in order to account for the "polygyny paradox." This paradox, as the authors define it, is the trend away from polygyny as societies adopt stratified agricultural economies. This is despite an increase in both the importance of material wealth and greater leaves of wealth inequality both of which would otherwise suggest increased polygyny. The authors develop a new model that does account for this paradox.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. Agricultural populations will show a reduced rate of polygyny and increased rates of monogamy relative to other subsistence systems (3)Ross, Cody T. - Greater wealth inequality, less polygyny: rethinking the polygyny threshold ..., 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors reconsider the polygyny threshold model in order to account for the "polygyny paradox." This paradox, as the authors define it, is the trend away from polygyny as societies adopt stratified agricultural economies. This is despite an increase in both the importance of material wealth and greater leaves of wealth inequality both of which would otherwise suggest increased polygyny. The authors develop a new model that does account for this paradox.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. Norms favoring the hereditary transmission of wealth will influence the development of institutionalized social inequality.Haynie, Hannah J. - Pathways to social inequality, 2021 - 4 Variables

    In this study, the authors examine pathways to social inequality, specifically social class hierarchy, in 408 non-industrial societies. In a path model, they find social class hierarchy to be directly associated with increased population size, intensive agriculture and large animal husbandry, real property inheritance (unigeniture) and hereditary political succession, with an overall R-squared of 0.45. They conclude that a complex web of effects consisting of environmental variables, mediated by resource intensification, wealth transmission variables, and population size all shape social inequality.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. Cultural transmission, resource scarcity, animal husbandry, community size, and caste stratification will be positively associated with a belief in moralizing gods, while agricultural potential, population size, and external warfare will be negatively associated with a belief in moralizing gods (11).Brown, Christian - The state and the supernatural: support for prosocial behavior, 2010 - 9 Variables

    This article identifies several methodological errors in the original study or moralizing gods by Roes and Raymond (2003) and presents new multiple regression model. Results suggest that a belief in moralizing gods is spread though cultural transmission, but it is also associated with conditions such as lower agricultural potential and lower external warfare. The authors theorize that moralizing gods have functional purposes such as bolstering property rights or maintaining social hierarchy.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. Degree of polygyny will be positively related to male bias in inheritance (1).Hartung, John - Polygyny and inheritance of wealth, 1982 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the hypothesis that humans tend to transmit wealth to male heirs where polygyny is possible. The results support this hypothesis.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. In weakly institutionalized traditional societies, the evil eye belief will be associated with religious norms.Gershman, Boris - The economic origins of the evil eye belief, 2015 - 3 Variables

    The author analyzes 76 societies synchronically, positing that the evil eye belief functions as a useful heuristic and prosocial/cohesive element in weakly-institutionalized societies with significant wealth inequality; in particular, the evil eye belief is found to be more prevalent in agro-pastoral societies where material wealth is vulnerable and plays a dominant role in subsistence economy.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. In weakly institutionalized traditional societies in which the evil eye belief is not indigenous, evil eye beliefs will be associated with spatial diffusion via cultural contact.Gershman, Boris - The economic origins of the evil eye belief, 2015 - 5 Variables

    The author analyzes 76 societies synchronically, positing that the evil eye belief functions as a useful heuristic and prosocial/cohesive element in weakly-institutionalized societies with significant wealth inequality; in particular, the evil eye belief is found to be more prevalent in agro-pastoral societies where material wealth is vulnerable and plays a dominant role in subsistence economy.

    Related HypothesesCite