Found 4585 Hypotheses across 459 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Rule-makers will be exempt from inbreeding rules (116-117, 122).Thornhill, Nancy Wilmsen - The evolutionary significance of incest rules, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates incest rules, proposing that they are instituted by rulers as a way of preventing wealth-concentration among non-ruling families. Three hypotheses are derived and supported with empirical analysis. Two alternative evolutionary hypotheses are discussed and dismissed by the author.

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  2. Extension of inbreeding rules will be associated with social stratification (116-117, 120).Thornhill, Nancy Wilmsen - The evolutionary significance of incest rules, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates incest rules, proposing that they are instituted by rulers as a way of preventing wealth-concentration among non-ruling families. Three hypotheses are derived and supported with empirical analysis. Two alternative evolutionary hypotheses are discussed and dismissed by the author.

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  3. Harshness of punishment for inbreeding will be associated with social stratification (116-117, 121).Thornhill, Nancy Wilmsen - The evolutionary significance of incest rules, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates incest rules, proposing that they are instituted by rulers as a way of preventing wealth-concentration among non-ruling families. Three hypotheses are derived and supported with empirical analysis. Two alternative evolutionary hypotheses are discussed and dismissed by the author.

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  4. Maternal care is inversely associated with environmental risks (p. 121).Quinlan, Robert J. - Human parental effort and environmental risk, 2007 - 4 Variables

    This article tests the effect of environmental risk on parental investment, differentiating between maternal and paternal care. Results indicate that the saturation point of parental investment may be a function of environmental risk, as parental care experiences diminishing returns due to extrinsic risks.

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  5. Paternal care is inversely associated with environmental risks (p. 121).Quinlan, Robert J. - Human parental effort and environmental risk, 2007 - 4 Variables

    This article tests the effect of environmental risk on parental investment, differentiating between maternal and paternal care. Results indicate that the saturation point of parental investment may be a function of environmental risk, as parental care experiences diminishing returns due to extrinsic risks.

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  6. "Hawaiian kin terms . . . are associated with the prohibition on [cross] cousin marriage" (136)Goody, Jack - Cousin terms, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses related to kinship terms, cousin marriage, and descent rules. Omaha, Crow, Eskimo, and Iroquois systems are each significantly associated with different kinship rules. Material from Northern Ghana is also considered.

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  7. "Iroquois [kin] terms . . . are associated with preferred cross-cousin marriage" (138)Goody, Jack - Cousin terms, 1970 - 2 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses related to kinship terms, cousin marriage, and descent rules. Omaha, Crow, Eskimo, and Iroquois systems are each significantly associated with different kinship rules. Material from Northern Ghana is also considered.

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  8. Degree of polygyny will be positively related to the severity of punishment for rape (160).Thornhill, Randy - Human rape: an evolutionary analysis, 1983 - 2 Variables

    This article presents tests of hypotheses derived from an evolutionary approach to the rape of women. A cross-cultural test of the relationship between polygyny and rape in non-industrial societies is presented. Results suggest that the degree of polygyny is positively associated with the severity of punishment for rape.

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  9. Pathogen stress will predict cultural rules restraining polygyny.Minocher, Riana - Explaining marriage patterns in a globally representative sample through soc..., 2019 - 2 Variables

    Researchers examine marriage patterns of 186 societies from the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS). The eleven predictor variables are pathogen stress, arranged female marriages, population density, father roles during infancy, temperature, social stratification, wealth inequality, internal warfare, assault frequency, female agricultural contribution, and sex ratio. The two outcome variables measuring polygyny are cultural rules constraining polygyny and the percentage of married men who are polygynous. Controlling on phylogeny using a global supertree of the languages, analysis of marriage patterns reveals that assault frequency and pathogen stress are the strongest predictors of polygyny. These findings offer additional support for the theories of harem-defense polygyny and male genetic quality.

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  10. Societies with cousin marriage will have more pathogen stress than those without cousin marriage (5,6).Hoben, Ashley D. - Factors influencing the allowance of cousin marriages in the Standard Cross ..., 2016 - 2 Variables

    The authors investigate environmental reasons for cross-cultural variation in the permissibility of cousin marriages. In particular, they test whether higher levels of pathogen prevalence and geographic isolation increase the likelihood that cousin marriage will be allowed. The authors' underlying theory is that cousin marriages provide protective homozygosity against some pathogens and provide more options when mate choices are limited.

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