Found 4587 Hypotheses across 459 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Environmental richness will be positively associated with the adoption of agriculture (882-3).Pryor, Frederic L. - The adoption of agriculture: some theoretical and empirical evidence, 1986 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates the adoption of agriculture. The author tests three possible predictors: environmental richness, population density, and division of labor by gender. Minimal support is found for these variables, and the author proposes two alternative explanations, based on diminishing returns in food production and balancing the food portfolio.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. Population density will be positively associated with the adoption of agriculture (883-6).Pryor, Frederic L. - The adoption of agriculture: some theoretical and empirical evidence, 1986 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates the adoption of agriculture. The author tests three possible predictors: environmental richness, population density, and division of labor by gender. Minimal support is found for these variables, and the author proposes two alternative explanations, based on diminishing returns in food production and balancing the food portfolio.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. Social differentiation will be positively associated with other types of inequality among different types of foraging economies. (52)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 9 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. Wives' higher labor relative to husbands' and political concentration will be associated with the presence of slaves owned as economic capital (p. 34).Pryor, Frederic L. - A comparative study of slave societies, 1977 - 3 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that slavery is an inevitable stage in society's economic development. The author rejects this hypothesis; he argues that there are two main types of slavery (slaves for economic capital or social capital) and each type has its own set of social and politcal determinants. Overall, the power dynamic between husbands and wives is thought to be a key predictor of slavery.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. The presence of the plow will be negatively associated with longer fallowing frequencies and the type of staple food (plow-negative or plow-positive) (737-8).Pryor, Frederic L. - The invention of the plow, 1985 - 3 Variables

    This study examines three theories of the origin of the plow. The author rejects the universalist approach on the basis that not all cultures that are aware of the plow adopt its use. Findings provide partial support for a theory focused on population density, particularly the importance of fallowing practices and labor productivity. The author’s own ecological approach, pointing to a culture’s staple food as a crucial variable, also receives empirical support.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. Extra-household division of labor will be postively associated with monogamy (p. 214).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. Female economic importance will be negatively associated with monogamy (p. 214).Dow, Malcolm M. - When one wife is enough: a cross-cultural study of the determinants of monogamy, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a myriad of factors that may have contributed to the adoption of monogamy in preindustrial societies. Results indicate that monogamy is not imposed by elites; rather, it is a strategy often chosen by women who can see no advantage to increasing the size or economic productivity of their households with more wives. The authors also assert that monogamy is generally adopted through cultural diffusion. Low pathogen stress, low risk of famine, and low endemic violence are also correlated with monogamy.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. The presence of noncentric transfers of goods is positively related to the presence of great inequality of total work of spouses (276).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. The festive reciprocal exchange of labor is also more likely to be found in agricultural societies (215).Pryor, Frederic L. - The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. Foraging economy type (Classic, transitional, human-wealth oriented, intangible-wealth oriented, politically oriented, and physical-wealth oriented) will be associated with certain social structural characteristics (50).Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 13 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

    Related HypothesesCite