Found 3030 Hypotheses across 303 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Controlling on economic and political factors, the effect of marital residence and descent on sexual dominance will approach zero (679)Johnson, G. David - A cross-cultural test of Collins’ theory of sexual stratification, 1982 - 6 Variables

    This article tests Randall Collin's 1975 theory that political-economic factors, rather than family/kinship factors, predict the degree of sexual stratification in a given society. A multivariate model is tested and findings contradict the theory.

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  2. Controlling on marital residence and descent, the effect of economic and political factors to sexual dominance will approach zero (680)Johnson, G. David - A cross-cultural test of Collins’ theory of sexual stratification, 1982 - 6 Variables

    This article tests Randall Collin's 1975 theory that political-economic factors, rather than family/kinship factors, predict the degree of sexual stratification in a given society. A multivariate model is tested and findings contradict the theory.

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  3. Marriage payments, patrilineal descent, patrilocal residence, extended family forms and importance of inheritance rules will be positively associated with sexual dominance (679)Johnson, G. David - A cross-cultural test of Collins’ theory of sexual stratification, 1982 - 6 Variables

    This article tests Randall Collin's 1975 theory that political-economic factors, rather than family/kinship factors, predict the degree of sexual stratification in a given society. A multivariate model is tested and findings contradict the theory.

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  4. Agricultural economy type (Herding-Plus, Egalitarian, Individualistic, or Semi-Marketized) will be associated with the presence of certain political institutions. (116)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 15 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  5. "The following variables of societal organization significantly distinguish monogamous from polygynous societies: (1) type of subsistence economy; (2) system of social stratification; (3) level of political integration; (4) pattern of settlement . . ." (10)Osmond, Marie W. - Toward monogamy: a cross-cultural study of correlates of type of marriage, 1965 - 5 Variables

    This study presents a sociological theory of marriage type based on socioeconomic organization. Results suggest that intensive agriculture, more stratification, greater political integration, a fixed settlement pattern, a larger population, and greater labor specialization tended to be correlates of monogamy.

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  6. Women's status will be negatively associated with the appearance in folklore of animals accorded male status and characteristics of ingelligence, authority and strength (175)Johnson, Mary A. - Animals in folklore: a cross-cultural study of their relation to the status ..., 1986 - 2 Variables

    A test of theory that gender assigned to animal characters in folklore will be associated with character traits based on gender status. Post facto theory for findings is presented.

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  7. "The position of women is unfavorable at all stages [of economic development--from hunters to pastoralists and agriculturalists]" (173)Hobhouse, L. T. - The material culture and social institutions of the simpler peoples: an ess..., 1915 - 2 Variables

    An early cross-cultural study that sought to establish correlations between "stages" of economic culture and a variety of different social and political institutions, such as form of government and justice, marriage and kinship, and behaviors during warfare.

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  8. Environmental circumscription will be correlated with the presence of inequality.Wilson, Kurt M. - The Marginal Utility of Inequality: A Global Examination Across Ethnographic..., 2020 - 2 Variables

    In this study, the authors draw from intensity theory and combine previous research from the fields of behavioral ecology, economics, and social evolution to analyze drivers in the emergence and persistence of inequality across the world. They propose that environmental heterogeneity and circumscription (the difficulty of moving and establishing oneself in a new environment relative to remaining in the current one) play a significant role in the stratification of societies. Their results indicate that situations arise from various environmental conditions and levels of circumscription that may result in an individual giving up autonomy for material gain, thus favoring inequality.

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  9. Social differentiation will be positively associated with other types of inequality among different types of foraging economies. (52)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 9 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  10. Various socio-economic variables (agricultural dependence, fixity of settlement, community size, population density, and class stratification) will predict political complexity (279).Hill, Kim - Political institutionalization in primitive societies: a hologeistic analysis, 1979 - 6 Variables

    This study examines socio-economic predictors of political complexity. Findings suggest that class stratification is the most significant predictor of political complexity.

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