Found 4316 Hypotheses across 432 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Expressed resource need in traditional societies will be positively associated with recent population increase and environmental degradation (359).Low, Bobbi S. - Behavioral ecology of conservation in traditional societies, 1996 - 3 Variables

    This article investigates resource availability and use in traditional societies, testing the belief that traditional societies are more environmentally responsible and sustainable. The author finds that these pre-industrial societies often do not express a conservation ethic; in fact, there are cases where resource use causes environmental degradation, especially following rapid population growth or technological development. In short, resource practices are affected by ecological variables, not by a particular attitude shared by traditional societies.

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  2. Resource scarcity will be associated with expressed resource need/conservation ethic (360).Low, Bobbi S. - Behavioral ecology of conservation in traditional societies, 1996 - 3 Variables

    This article investigates resource availability and use in traditional societies, testing the belief that traditional societies are more environmentally responsible and sustainable. The author finds that these pre-industrial societies often do not express a conservation ethic; in fact, there are cases where resource use causes environmental degradation, especially following rapid population growth or technological development. In short, resource practices are affected by ecological variables, not by a particular attitude shared by traditional societies.

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  3. More polygyny will be associated with training boys to strive more (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  4. Patrilocality will be positively associated with men's training for obedience (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  5. Greater control of resources by women will be negatvely associated with obedience training for females (p. 313).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  6. More stratification will be positively associated with males' training to be industrious, and obedient and females' training to be sexually restrained and obedient. Stratification will be negatively associated with males and females' training to be self-reliant (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  7. Larger social group size will be associated with training that reduces intra-group conflict (p. 313).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  8. Males will be trained to demonstrate more competitive behaviors useful for resource acquisition and control (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  9. Environmental degradation in traditional societies will be positively associated with recent population increases and technological improvement (358-9).Low, Bobbi S. - Behavioral ecology of conservation in traditional societies, 1996 - 3 Variables

    This article investigates resource availability and use in traditional societies, testing the belief that traditional societies are more environmentally responsible and sustainable. The author finds that these pre-industrial societies often do not express a conservation ethic; in fact, there are cases where resource use causes environmental degradation, especially following rapid population growth or technological development. In short, resource practices are affected by ecological variables, not by a particular attitude shared by traditional societies.

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  10. Unpredictability in climatic variables, particularly rainfall, will influence primary productivity, presence of herbivores, and availability of food (238).Low, Bobbi S. - Human responses to environmental extremeness and uncertainty: a cross-cultur..., 1988 - 4 Variables

    This article focuses on the effect of environmental extremes and unpredictability on human behavior and reproductive strategies. Significant correlations were found between environmental extremes and unpredictability and several variables, including mobility, subsistence mode, and degree of polygyny.

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