Found 2933 Hypotheses across 294 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Controlling on monotheism, the number of sovereign groups will be positively associated with gender bias (1127)Gray, J. Patrick - Do women have higher social status in hunting societies without high gods?, 1987 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a critique of Stover and Hope (1984). Gray challenges their findings and suggests that a third variable, sovereign groups, explains the correlation between monotheism and gender status.

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  2. Controlling on gender bias, the number of sovereign groups will be positively associated with monotheism (1127)Gray, J. Patrick - Do women have higher social status in hunting societies without high gods?, 1987 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a critique of Stover and Hope (1984). Gray challenges their findings and suggests that a third variable, sovereign groups, explains the correlation between monotheism and gender status.

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  3. Regionally, the relationship between monotheism and gender bias will vary significantly (1122)Gray, J. Patrick - Do women have higher social status in hunting societies without high gods?, 1987 - 2 Variables

    This article offers a critique of Stover and Hope (1984). Gray challenges their findings and suggests that a third variable, sovereign groups, explains the correlation between monotheism and gender status.

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  4. Hunting societies will be negatively associated with high status for women (1121)Gray, J. Patrick - Do women have higher social status in hunting societies without high gods?, 1987 - 2 Variables

    This article offers a critique of Stover and Hope (1984). Gray challenges their findings and suggests that a third variable, sovereign groups, explains the correlation between monotheism and gender status.

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  5. Number of sovereign groups will be positively associated with monotheism (867-8).Swanson, Guy E. - Monotheism, materialism, and collective purpose: an analysis of underhill's ..., 1975 - 2 Variables

    This article contests Underhill’s (1975) claim that monotheism is associated more strongly with subsistence than political organization in preindustrial societies. The author asserts that when political organization is held constant, there is no relationship between subsistence strategy and monotheism. Number of sovereign groups is found to be a good predictor of monotheism.

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  6. Societies with more corporate political strategies are more resilient to catastrophic climate-related disastersPeregrine, Peter N. - Social resilience to climate-related disasters in ancient societies: a test ..., 2017 - 8 Variables

    In the present study, Peregrine tests two perspectives regarding social resilience to climate-related disasters: 1) that societies with more inclusive and participatory political structures (corporate political strategies) are more resilient to climate-related disasters, and 2) that societies with tighter adherence to social norms are more resilient to climate-related disasters. Results support the notion that societies with greater political participation are more socially resilient to catastrophic climate-related disasters. Because these results are justifiably generalizable across multiple historical and cultural contexts, Peregrine's findings are a useful contribution to aid in disaster response policy decision making.

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  7. Patrilocal societies are more likely to have active high gods (321). This will be true when individually controlling for society size (jurisdictional hierarchy), class stratification, caste stratification, and region.Roes, Frans L. - Permanent group membership, 2014 - 6 Variables

    This article reviews the theory that permanent animal groups have only one sex breed outside the group in order to balance genetic diversity and group relatedness. The author theorises that since males inherit valuable membership in patrilocal/lineal societies, they are expected to be more concerned about the probability of paternity than males in matrilocal/lineal societies. Moral rules, and specifically belief in moralizing gods, are expected to reflect this difference. In other words, moralizing gods are used to restrict the sexual activity of women.

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  8. "environmental and psychological factors will be related to interpersonal distance across countries (581)"Sorokowska, Agnieszka - Preferred interpersonal distances: A global comparison, 2017 - 11 Variables

    The authors assess and compare preferred interpersonal distances over 42 countries. Environmental and sociopsychological factors are tested in order to explain variability in interpersonal distance across cultures. The authors seek to go beyond previous studies and better understand cultural differences and similarities in proxemic behaviors.

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  9. Active high gods will be more likely in societies with patrilocal marital residence, patrilineal descent, and transfer of wife to husband’s group after marriage (321). This will be true when individually controlling for society size (jurisdictional hierarchy), stratification, region, and religion.Roes, Frans L. - Permanent group membership, 2014 - 9 Variables

    This article reviews the theory that permanent animal groups have only one sex breed outside the group in order to balance genetic diversity and group relatedness. The author theorises that since males inherit valuable membership in patrilocal/lineal societies, they are expected to be more concerned about the probability of paternity than males in matrilocal/lineal societies. Moral rules, and specifically belief in moralizing gods, are expected to reflect this difference. In other words, moralizing gods are used to restrict the sexual activity of women.

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  10. Dependence on root crops will be associated with increased female contribution to agriculture.Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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