Found 4405 Hypotheses across 441 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Societies will be more likely to have more male sports than female sports (280).Deaner, Robert. O - Sex differences in sports across 50 societies, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article examines sex differences in sports and games of strategy and chance. Results indicated large differences in participation by gender, especially for combat and hunting sports and in patriarchal societies. The possible cross-cultural universality of this trend is discussed.

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  2. Males will particpate more than females in sports (280).Deaner, Robert. O - Sex differences in sports across 50 societies, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This article examines sex differences in sports and games of strategy and chance. Results indicated large differences in participation by gender, especially for combat and hunting sports and in patriarchal societies. The possible cross-cultural universality of this trend is discussed.

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  3. The ratio of female-to-male sports will be greater in nonpatriarchal societies (284).Deaner, Robert. O - Sex differences in sports across 50 societies, 2013 - 3 Variables

    This article examines sex differences in sports and games of strategy and chance. Results indicated large differences in participation by gender, especially for combat and hunting sports and in patriarchal societies. The possible cross-cultural universality of this trend is discussed.

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  4. Hunter-gatherer societies with coalitional play fighting will also participate in mock warfare.Scalise Sugiyama, Michelle - War Games: Intergroup Coalitional Play Fighting as a Means of Comparative Co..., 2021 - 2 Variables

    The authors explore coalitional play fighting (in which teams of at least two play against each other to achieve a goal) across hunter-gatherer societies, with the theory that play of this type may be a mechanism for assessing strength and utility for future defense or warfare. When played against other communities, they propose coalitional play fighting can also serve to gauge strength of potential allies or formidability of potential enemies. In order to test their theories, they predict that, despite the large energy cost and risk of sports associated with coalitional play fighting, these types of games will be widespread in hunter-gatherer societies. In addition, they predict that of those exhibiting coalitional play fighting, many will play against other communities. In support of their hypotheses, they find that 54% of hunter-gatherer societies examined exhibit coalitional play fighting, of which 81% play against other communities.

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  5. ". . . high stratification of freeman is associated with hereditary slavery, and low stratification with the absence of slavery" (694)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  6. "[There is] a highly significant association between lateral succession to the headman's position and matriliny, and lineal succession and patriliny" (707)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  7. [In matrilineal systems there is a] ". . . strong association of monogamy with matrilocality, as compared with other forms of marriage and other forms of residence" (719)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  8. [In matrilineal systems] "The relationship of sororal and limited sororal polygyny with matrilocality, and of general and non-sororal polygyny with virilocality is strong and significant. . . . Also . . . the association of general and non-sororal polygyny with avunculocality and sororal and limited sororal polygyny is even stronger" (719)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  9. [There is] " . . . a relationship between residence and stratification in matrilineal systems. . . . Matrilocality is associated with minimal stratification and avunculocality with maximal stratification" (719)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  10. [Descent is related] ". . . to stratification. . . . Matrilineal systems tend to have hereditary, rather than complex stratification to a greater degree than . . . patrilineal and bilateral systems" (698)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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