Found 4404 Hypotheses across 441 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Sexual restrictions on unmarried girls predict nasal and narrow singing.Erickson, Edwin E. - Tradition and evolution in song style: a reanalysis of cantometric data, 1976 - 2 Variables

    The author reanalyzes hypotheses proposed by Lomax et al. (1968) that are based on Lomax's collection of cantometric data. Considering historical/regional variables, the author suggests that difusion and common history better explain certain musical features such as wordiness than functional and evolutionary processes. However, other Lomax findings are supported involving interlocked, contrapuntal singing and narrow nasal-voiced singing.

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  2. There is a relationship between melodic ornamentation and sociocomplexity.Erickson, Edwin E. - Tradition and evolution in song style: a reanalysis of cantometric data, 1976 - 3 Variables

    The author reanalyzes hypotheses proposed by Lomax et al. (1968) that are based on Lomax's collection of cantometric data. Considering historical/regional variables, the author suggests that difusion and common history better explain certain musical features such as wordiness than functional and evolutionary processes. However, other Lomax findings are supported involving interlocked, contrapuntal singing and narrow nasal-voiced singing.

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  3. "Women are more likely . . . to assert themselves [i.e., to have sung rasp] in societies where they make a significant or predominant contribution to subsistence" (208).Erickson, Edwin E. - Self-assertion, sex role, and vocal rasp, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines the relationship between singing behavior, specifically vocal rasp, and sex-role differences. Results suggest that conformity training is negatively associated with the use of vocal rasp. Results also suggest that women are more likely to sing with vocal rasp in societies where they make a more significant contribution to subsistence.

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  4. "When the frequency of extreme rasp per culture is ranged against the compliance/assertion score, a statistically significant correlation emerges suggesting that . . . conformity is a negative condition for sung rasp" (207).Erickson, Edwin E. - Self-assertion, sex role, and vocal rasp, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter examines the relationship between singing behavior, specifically vocal rasp, and sex-role differences. Results suggest that conformity training is negatively associated with the use of vocal rasp. Results also suggest that women are more likely to sing with vocal rasp in societies where they make a more significant contribution to subsistence.

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  5. "Where feminine premarital sexual activity is severely restricted or santioned, narrowing and nasality, both signs of tension become prominent. . . . Relaxed vocalizing is relatively uncommon" (195-196)Lomax, Alan - Folk song style and culture, 1968 - 3 Variables

    A large-scale comparative study of folk songs around the world employing systematic measures (cantometrics). The aim was not just to describe variation but to test hypotheses about the relationships between song style and societal structures. Dance was also considered.

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  6. "Solo singing . . . and diffuse choral performance . . . are likely to be found in cultures where unstable [work] teams are the rule" (184-185)Lomax, Alan - Folk song style and culture, 1968 - 3 Variables

    A large-scale comparative study of folk songs around the world employing systematic measures (cantometrics). The aim was not just to describe variation but to test hypotheses about the relationships between song style and societal structures. Dance was also considered.

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  7. "Vocal tension (narrow, nasal vocalizing) is far higher in non-complementary societies, where men perform all or most of the main subsistence tasks" (200)Lomax, Alan - Folk song style and culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    A large-scale comparative study of folk songs around the world employing systematic measures (cantometrics). The aim was not just to describe variation but to test hypotheses about the relationships between song style and societal structures. Dance was also considered.

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  8. Interlocking, a maximally individualized and leaderless style [in which everyone present sings independently in melody, rhythm, and harmony] occurs most frequently among cultures dependent on collecting (156).Lomax, Alan - Song as a measure of culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores the relationship between cultural complexity and song. Several measures of cultural complexity are correlated with different aspects of singing. All hypotheses are supported.

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  9. Stable settlements are more likely to sing together cohesively (188)Lomax, Alan - Folk song style and culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    A large-scale comparative study of folk songs around the world employing systematic measures (cantometrics). The aim was not just to describe variation but to test hypotheses about the relationships between song style and societal structures. Dance was also considered.

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  10. "A . . . strong relationship exists between the percentage of stable [work] teams found in a culture and the incidence of cohesive vocalizing per culture" (183)Lomax, Alan - Folk song style and culture, 1968 - 2 Variables

    A large-scale comparative study of folk songs around the world employing systematic measures (cantometrics). The aim was not just to describe variation but to test hypotheses about the relationships between song style and societal structures. Dance was also considered.

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