Found 3128 Hypotheses across 313 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Pair-bond instability (proxy measure being higher incidence of maternal half siblings) will be greater where male contribution to subsistence is lower. (2)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  2. Pair-bond instability (proxy measure being higher incidence of maternal half siblings) will be greater in the absence of amassable, heritable resources. (3)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  3. Pair-bond instability (proxy measure being higher incidence of maternal half siblings) will be greater among partible paternity societies. (3)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  4. Male reproductive skew (proxy measure being incidence of paternal half-siblings) will be higher in societies at lower latitudes. (2)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  5. Male reproductive skew (proxy measure being incidence of paternal half-siblings) will be highest in horticultural societies in comparison to other subsistence modes. (2)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  6. Pair-bond instability (proxy measure being higher incidence of maternal half siblings) will be lower at higher latitudes, irrespective of subsistence mode. (2-3)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  7. Female premarital sex is more likely to be restricted in societies with higher direct paternal investment.Šaffa, Gabriel - Paternity Uncertainty and Parent–Offspring Conflict Explain Restrictions on ..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    This study tests competing theories about whether it is men, women, or parents who benefit most from restricting female premarital sex (FPS) in a global sample of 128 non-industrial societies. The study found support for the idea that multiple parties benefit from restrictions on FPS -- specifically FPS is more restricted in societies intolerant of extramarital sex and where men transfer property to their children (male control), as well as where marriages are arranged by parents (parental control). They also found that major predictors of FPS appear to be paternity uncertainty and parent-offspring conflict. Furthermore, the study found that multiple factors such as social roles, rather than stereotyped sex roles, are a more useful approach in understanding FPS restrictions and these restrictions.

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  8. Agricultural societies will have higher paternal certainty than hunter-gatherer societies (230).Gaulin, Steven J.C. - Sexual dimorphism in the human post-reproductive life-span: possible causes, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This study tests possible explanations for sexual dimorphism in human post-reproductive life-spans. The author focuses on explanations involving male paternal investment and finds that men in agricultural societies are more likely to invest in their offspring than men in hunter-gatherer societies.

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  9. Increased levels of paternal provisioning were associated with harsher views of male, but not female sexual infidelity .Scelza, B. A. - Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous ..., 2019 - 2 Variables

    In an effort to better understand variation in jealous response cross-culturally, the researchers of this study surveyed 11 different populations, eight of which were small-scale societies on five different continents (Mayangna, Shuar, Tsimane, Himba, Hadza, Karo Batak, Mosuo, and Yasawa) and three of which were in urban settings (Los Angeles, CA, "urban India" (online), and Okinawa, Japan). Looking at the differences between sexual and emotional infidelity, researchers found that greater paternal investment and lower frequency of extramarital sex are associated with more severe jealous response.

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  10. Increased levels of paternal investment and provisioning were associated with harsher views of male, but not female emotional infidelity .Scelza, B. A. - Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous ..., 2019 - 2 Variables

    In an effort to better understand variation in jealous response cross-culturally, the researchers of this study surveyed 11 different populations, eight of which were small-scale societies on five different continents (Mayangna, Shuar, Tsimane, Himba, Hadza, Karo Batak, Mosuo, and Yasawa) and three of which were in urban settings (Los Angeles, CA, "urban India" (online), and Okinawa, Japan). Looking at the differences between sexual and emotional infidelity, researchers found that greater paternal investment and lower frequency of extramarital sex are associated with more severe jealous response.

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