Found 2823 Hypotheses across 283 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Pair-bond instability (proxy measure being higher incidence of maternal half siblings) will be greater where male contribution to subsistence is lower. (2)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  2. Pair-bond instability (proxy measure being higher incidence of maternal half siblings) will be greater in the absence of amassable, heritable resources. (3)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  3. Pair-bond instability (proxy measure being higher incidence of maternal half siblings) will be greater among partible paternity societies. (3)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  4. Male reproductive skew (proxy measure being incidence of paternal half-siblings) will be higher in societies at lower latitudes. (2)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  5. Male reproductive skew (proxy measure being incidence of paternal half-siblings) will be highest in horticultural societies in comparison to other subsistence modes. (2)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  6. Pair-bond instability (proxy measure being higher incidence of maternal half siblings) will be lower at higher latitudes, irrespective of subsistence mode. (2-3)Ellsworth, Ryan M. - Comparative study of reproductive skew and pair-bond stability using genealo..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors use genealogical data to investigate pair bond stability and reproductive skew across a sample of 80 small-scale societies. Results suggest that male reproductive skew and pair-bond stability are independent sources of cross-cultural variation in human mating patterns.

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  7. Subsistence based primarily on hunting-gathering will be associated with extensive kinship systems, whereas agropastoralism will be associated with intensive ones (384).Walker, Robert S. - Marrying kin in small‐scale societies, 2014 - 4 Variables

    The authors examine degree of intensiveness (kin-relatedness) among foraging and agropastoralist societies, predicting that hunter-gatherers will pursue more extensive kinship networks in order to maximize residential options in the case of unpredictability or uneven geographic distribution of food resources. Support is found for the hypothesis, and it is suggested that while extensive fission-fusion dynamics are beneficial in foraging systems, the increase in cooperation in large-scale agricultural settlements is aided by norms which encourage kin marriage and relatedness.

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  8. Agricultural societies will have higher paternal certainty than hunter-gatherer societies (230).Gaulin, Steven J.C. - Sexual dimorphism in the human post-reproductive life-span: possible causes, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This study tests possible explanations for sexual dimorphism in human post-reproductive life-spans. The author focuses on explanations involving male paternal investment and finds that men in agricultural societies are more likely to invest in their offspring than men in hunter-gatherer societies.

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  9. Pair-bond stability will be positively associated with polygyny (153).Quinlan, Robert J. - Evolutionary ecology of human pair-bonds: cross-cultural tests of alternativ..., 2007 - 2 Variables

    This study tests three hypotheses on the evolution of the human pair-bond: male-provisioning, male mating competition, and the defense of offspring from other males. Findings indicate that male provisioning and mating competition are factors in the development of the pair-bond. Additional findings indicate that alloparentling, polygyny, and equal contribution to subsistence by each sex contribute to the security of the pair-bond.

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  10. Pair-bonds are more supportive of lactation than are other kin relations (88).Quinlan, Robert J. - Human lactation, pair-bonds, and alloparents: a cross-cultural analysis, 2008 - 6 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between pairbonds and lactation, specifically the relationship between pairbond stability, alloparenting, and cross-cultural trends in breastfeeding. Findings show that both conjugal stability and availability of alloparental care are associated with age at weaning.

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